willing to live with feet in the air

One never knows what a day will bring forth (see the book of Job). Yet there’s nothing new under the sun (Ecclesiastes). Things are set in place, the only difference being variations of the same.

I’m not one that’s fond of heights, though I have gotten up when I have to. I like safety, feet on the ground. Real life and the life of faith seem to involve feet in the air, unpredictability in place. Not that feet on the ground is completely safe, either.

The life of faith in this world involves an element of uncertainty. We don’t know what we’re going to face from day to day, week to week, month to month, year to year, and beyond. But with that there’s the certainty that faith brings. God is faithful, and God’s promises in Jesus for us and for the world are true, trustworthy, and certain.

So no matter what today or tomorrow might bring forth, God will see us through if we only trust in him. In and through Jesus.

 

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simple faith can be underrated, overlooked

As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed him, calling out, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!”

When he had gone indoors, the blind men came to him, and he asked them, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?”

“Yes, Lord,” they replied.

Then he touched their eyes and said, “According to your faith let it be done to you”; and their sight was restored.

Matthew 9:27-30a

I think too often we can overlook the importance of simple faith. Faith in God, in our Lord, for sure, but just pure unadulterated faith.

Instead somehow we think we have to do it. Yes, with help from God, maybe even by God’s grace, but still it’s up to us. Actually faith is up to us, the rest is up to God. Not to say that once we put our faith in God we’re automatons, passively carried along by God. Not at all. We’re active, but it’s completely different.

In the case of the two blind men, whether or not they had faith in God, in our Lord, in Jesus’s ability to heal them mattered to Jesus. It may seem that we don’t have much faith, but we’re to put what faith we have completely in God, in Jesus. And by simple faith receive what Jesus has to give us. That can make all the difference in the world.

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

 

simply believing in Jesus in John’s gospel account

Jesus performed many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book. But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.

John 20:30-31

In John’s gospel account, the NIV translates the Greek word πιστεύω “believe” (or a tense of that) 84 times. To believe in John is to believe Jesus’s message which is a call to believe in him, that he is the one to come, the Messiah and Son of God (which are equivalents in the gospels), and to entrust oneself to him. John’s gospel account is full of sayings of Jesus pointing people to himself, like “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” “I am the bread of life.” “I am the good shepherd.” “I am the light of the world.” “I am the resurrection and the life.” “Before Abraham was born, I am.”

And then there’s the signs, Jesus’s miracles, or mighty works. Throughout John, seven major signs. Jesus appealed to them when people didn’t believe in him. He said, “Even if you don’t believe me, believe the works themselves, that you may know that I’m in the Father, and that the Father is in me.”

Simply believing might be underrated in churches and Christians circles at times. The kind of faith our Lord refers to though is more than just believing so as to be drawn in. It refers to a commitment based on our Lord’s words, which call for nothing less than that. The idea that Christianity and Christian ethics is just about one’s works and not what one believes is so far divorced from actual Christianity. Completely foreign to Scripture, and John’s gospel. Of course works in a change of life follow. An indispensable part of the faith offered to us in and through Jesus.

 

“do you want to get well?”

Some time later, Jesus went up to Jerusalem for one of the Jewish festivals. Now there is in Jerusalem near the Sheep Gate a pool, which in Aramaic is called Bethesda and which is surrounded by five covered colonnades. Here a great number of disabled people used to lie—the blind, the lame, the paralyzed. One who was there had been an invalid for thirty-eight years. When Jesus saw him lying there and learned that he had been in this condition for a long time, he asked him, “Do you want to get well?”

“Sir,” the invalid replied, “I have no one to help me into the pool when the water is stirred. While I am trying to get in, someone else goes down ahead of me.”

Then Jesus said to him, “Get up! Pick up your mat and walk.” At once the man was cured; he picked up his mat and walked.

John 5:1-8

A man had been disabled for thirty-eight years, so that he couldn’t even move quickly enough to get himself into a pool when the waters stirred, probably close to it, but time and time again another making it in before him to be healed. You would think that Jesus’s question to him made little or no sense: “Do you want to get well?” That ought to be a no-brainer.

But a big part of faith beyond an understanding of need, and the desire to have that need met is the audacity to believe God can do it, and the willingness for whatever change accompanies that. When it comes to personal need, something that has been a part of us so long, like say, depression, or anxiety, or whatever, it is so much a part of us, and we’ve learned to cope maybe like the man in the story for so long, and we’ve nursed attitudes because of it, that it’s maybe hard to imagine anything else, perhaps even threatening. Faith accepts God’s question and invitation, and is willing for the breakthrough, what is otherwise impossible, at God’s call and healing word.

Interesting later that Jesus found the man he had healed and addressed him with these words:

“See, you are well again. Stop sinning or something worse may happen to you.”

John 5:14b

Jesus knows each and every heart, evidenced by his initial probing of the man before he healed him. He knows just what we need. We need to pay close attention and seek to adjust, in repentance and faith. God can and will help us in ways we can’t help ourselves, as we look to Jesus and seek to follow him. In and through Jesus.

what we’re responsible for

…do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Matthew 6:34

So often we can either get caught up in the past or the future. Downcast because of past mistakes and sins. Apprehensive because of possible future consequences or fear of the unknown.

That is part of the ploy of the enemy (spiritual, of course). But what we’re called to do is what Jesus tells us here (click reference for context). We’re not to worry about tomorrow, and we’re not to be frozen or even defined by past mistakes. What we’re responsible for is the present, right now.

We repent over past sins, and try to learn from past mistakes so that we can do better, gathering wisdom from Scripture. Of course we can’t undo the past, as much as we would like. But hopefully it can serve as a help for us, so that we can help others. Nor do we wring our hands in apprehension over the future. Jesus’s words address that directly in Matthew 6 (click link above). Our Father knows all we need, and will take care of our needs as we trust in him, and seek first his righteousness and kingdom in our lives, and in life in general.

It is so vitally important to have hope for today, right now. Not to be down because of the past, or be worrying about the future. It’s the present we’re responsible for. We don’t want to let the devil get us down and out because of what is out of our control.

It’s the present in which we live, where God meets us, and helps us to receive from him so that we in turn might give to others. In and through Jesus.

the challenge and reward of trusting God

It’s a lifelong challenge, but there’s ever present, and pressing at times, the need to trust in God. Or we may not see that possibility, and think it all depends on us. Left to ourselves, we might actually do well. Though if we would only realize that our very existence, as well as what we can do is all a gift from God. But God wants to give us special help, if only we’ll look to him. In fact, God will let us fail, because we actually do need him.

I like to have a scripture passage on my post, or at least refer to scripture passages, but this is all over scripture. Open your Bibles most anywhere, and start to read, and it won’t take long to see something of this. Though of course scripture covers the entire gamut of life. But faith and trust in God is so central to what we need to do as human beings.

It’s also a lifelong opportunity. Instead of worrying ourselves sick, or trying to figure things out ourselves, we do well to turn to God, and to the counsel of scripture. Proverbs (see, I couldn’t resist mentioning some specific scripture) is full of practical, down to earth wisdom throughout. And we really need all of scripture. But that alone won’t do it. We also need to look to God as we’re in scripture, in God’s word and prayer. God will help us. In and through Jesus.

trusting in God no matter what

At the first light of dawn, the king got up and hurried to the lions’ den.When he came near the den, he called to Daniel in an anguished voice, “Daniel, servant of the living God, has your God, whom you serve continually, been able to rescue you from the lions?”

Daniel answered, “May the king live forever! My God sent his angel, and he shut the mouths of the lions. They have not hurt me, because I was found innocent in his sight. Nor have I ever done any wrong before you, Your Majesty.”

The king was overjoyed and gave orders to lift Daniel out of the den. And when Daniel was lifted from the den, no wound was found on him, because he had trusted in his God.

Daniel 6:19-23

Daniel was faithful no matter what. But underlying that faithfulness was a rock solid faith in the faithfulness of God. Daniel trusted God.

Daniel’s trust was not hinged to good circumstances. It was trust in God through good times and bad times. It was honed and made solid from years of daily practice. The development and growth of faith takes considerable time.

The king, Darius, was led to make a decree which was set up by men who were jealous of Daniel, and wanted to get rid of him. But Daniel payed no attention to the edict to pray only to the king, and continued day after day to open his windows and face Jerusalem, praying to God. According to the edict, whoever prayed to anyone other than the king was to be thrown into the lion’s den.

Daniel trusted in his God no matter what. I’m sure he wasn’t assured of the outcome, but he was assured that through life or death God could be trusted. In this case it was an outcome which for Daniel was good, but not for his enemies. A pretty ruthless day and age.

The passage talks about the king’s emotional state, but not Daniel’s. I’m sure Daniel had emotions throughout it. But above all, he kept trusting God, I’m sure by praying. And if he had scrolls, looking into God’s word, or hearing it at weekly gatherings where it was read. And he continued to do what he was called to do.

We might face fearful circumstances, or quite often just fearful thoughts which frequently are baseless.  The roaring lion, the devil prowls about looking for someone to devour, the context in Peter in the midst of suffering (1 Peter 5:8-9). But God shuts the mouth of the lion. In a certain way now the devil can’t touch us (1 John 5:18). The roar is meant to instill fear. We need to ignore that and continue on in faith. Doing what God has called us to do, and above all continuing to trust in him. God will always see us through to the very end in and through Jesus.