in Jesus we are invited to intimacy and enthronement with him

“To the angel of the church in Laodicea write:

These are the words of the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the ruler of God’s creation. I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either one or the other! So, because you are lukewarm—neither hot nor cold—I am about to spit you out of my mouth. You say, ‘I am rich; I have acquired wealth and do not need a thing.’ But you do not realize that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked. I counsel you to buy from me gold refined in the fire,so you can become rich; and white clothes to wear, so you can cover your shameful nakedness; and salve to put on your eyes, so you can see.

Those whom I love I rebuke and discipline. So be earnest and repent. Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.

To the one who is victorious, I will give the right to sit with me on my throne, just as I was victorious and sat down with my Father on his throne. Whoever has ears, let them hear what the Spirit says to the churches.”

Revelation 3:14-22

We may live in a Laodicean kind of age, not at all related to any dispensational scheme, but with something of the kind of Christianity we see in the Laodicean church of old. They were well off and satisfied with their lives, even as they named the name of Christ. But Jesus told them that there was something vitally missing. It wasn’t necessarily that they lacked a personal relationship with Jesus altogether, though it does seem weak at best. They are told that they are loved by God, and therefore being disciplined, at least that is intimated.

About a personal relationship with Jesus. I know that is bashed in some quarters of the church, but even if it might be overemphasized by some, while other matters of importance which are also central to the faith are largely ignored, it still, I say, is important. We have to keep reading scripture to really see if that’s the case, but I think a fair reading of the Final, New Testament will amply bring that out.

Yes, Jesus is on the outside knocking, so to speak. He wants a close fellowship, or communion with us. That is among other things which is at the heart of the faith, and in a way, we might say, at the heartbeat of it all.

And the idea that we’re not in a battle, and that it should all go easy if we’re in the Spirit is simply not a matter of fact either in reality, or in the pages of the Bible, including the New Testament. We are, and to realize that, we can say, is half the battle. Of course being “in the Spirit” will help us deal with the hard places, but it is no less a battle, of course spiritual in nature.

And what we’re promised if we’re victorious in and through Jesus is shocking and mind boggling. We are told that we’ll end up sitting with Jesus on his throne, even as Jesus after his victory sat with his Father on his throne. I can just imagine millions upon millions upon millions getting to take their turn seated with Jesus on his throne, and in the Spirit somehow always seated with Jesus on his throne. It’s interesting that even now we are seated with the ascended Christ, who is at the right hand of God, enthroned with the Father; that we are seated with him positionally, and perhaps by the Spirit there (Ephesians 1-2).

And so a close intimacy in knowing Jesus seems tied to being victorious in him in this life, so that in the end we are honored with him in and through him. As long as we’re in this present life, both are of vital importance.

…we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

Romans 8

 

grace comes through real life

Too often we are so caught up in how we feel, or what we’re up against, that we can become discouraged and be tempted to despair, even while we continue to plod along. And add to that, the ideal put in front of us that we shouldn’t be that way, that we should be on top of the world, feeling well and fine and dandy. That can make us feel all the more down.

But God’s grace in Jesus comes through in the real and rugged parts of our lives. We need not despair, even when we feel in despair, and sometimes for some good reason. God in Jesus is present. Remember: Emmanuel: God-with-us. We are not alone, and we’re not on our own.

We certainly face challenges along the way. On a number of fronts in our world, life can indeed be hard. It is the real world, after all. Certainly there are blessings as well, along the way, and we need to “count [our] many blessings,” no doubt. We should be thankful to God for his rich provision for us. At the same time, we don’t need to pretend that all is well. In the real world all is not well. Obviously there are sicknesses out there, as well as broken places everywhere, some especially broken in need of serious help, and divine intervention where there seems to be no answer. Yes, we live in the real world.

But like a cup of coffee can help us get going in the morning, remembering that God in Jesus is for us, and that by faith we belong to him, can give us that needed spiritual boost to continue on with confidence and good cheer that God will help and see us through, and even that we are victorious, indeed “more than conquerors through him who loves us” (Romans 8). Right in the midst life in the real world. A word that I need this Monday morning.

we in Jesus are meant to be victorious

“To the angel of the church in Pergamum write:

These are the words of him who has the sharp, double-edged sword. I know where you live—where Satan has his throne. Yet you remain true to my name. You did not renounce your faith in me, not even in the days of Antipas, my faithful witness, who was put to death in your city—where Satan lives.

Nevertheless, I have a few things against you: There are some among you who hold to the teaching of Balaam, who taught Balak to entice the Israelites to sin so that they ate food sacrificed to idols and committed sexual immorality. Likewise, you also have those who hold to the teaching of the Nicolaitans. Repent therefore! Otherwise, I will soon come to you and will fight against them with the sword of my mouth.

Whoever has ears, let them hear what the Spirit says to the churches. To the one who is victorious, I will give some of the hidden manna. I will also give that person a white stone with a new name written on it, known only to the one who receives it.

Revelation 2:12-17

In an existence of the world, the flesh, and the devil, we are not only pummelled with this and that, sometimes real, legitimate concerns, but also at other times real temptations and sins, both in our own lives, and in those around us. I added the first, not germane to the text above, but certainly addressed by our Lord, as well as elsewhere in scripture. This text has to do with actual sin.

The way of victory as translated by the NIV (see also, the NLT and the CEB in the link above) is to be victorious. It is translated as if this is something which is true of us in Jesus, perhaps in keeping with the grammar of the original Greek. We do have it from Romans 8:37 that in all the troubles of this life, particularly because of that which would challenge, undermine and even destroy our faith, “we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.” In other words, it’s because of our standing in Jesus that we can indeed emerge victorious. By and in God’s grace in Jesus we can overcome, and in fact we simply are more than conquerors.

There is much opposition to faith and the faith in this life. But even greater than that is the reality that is ours in Jesus, and through his death and resurrection, along with his ascension. We are victorious in him, and we simply need to live out what is true of us already, a recurrent theme in the New Testament concerning our new identity in Jesus. What is his through his person and work is given to us to live out in this world individually and together, to show to the world the power of the gospel and the salvation that is in and through Jesus.