the Lord is our light

The LORD is my light and my salvation…

Psalm 27:1a

Jesus…said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”

John 8:12

There are many lights in the world, so to speak. What Hollywood would call, stars. Those in whom people put their confidence and admire and emulate.

For Christians though, there’s only one in whom we put our full and utmost confidence and praise: the Triune God: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. And as Jesus said, as we endeavor to follow him, we will indeed have the light we need for our lives.

We follow Jesus by paying close attention to what he said and did. And to Scripture which he himself is the finishing point and fulfillment of. The light we Christians receive is from the Lord himself who is our light. And then we are lights in him (Matthew 5:14-16). Our lives are meant to be a light to others from the light we receive. In and through Jesus.

 

 

the difference God makes through his word

י Yodh

Your hands made me and formed me;
give me understanding to learn your commands.
May those who fear you rejoice when they see me,
for I have put my hope in your word.
I know, LORD, that your laws are righteous,
and that in faithfulness you have afflicted me.
May your unfailing love be my comfort,
according to your promise to your servant.
Let your compassion come to me that I may live,
for your law is my delight.
May the arrogant be put to shame for wronging me without cause;
but I will meditate on your precepts.
May those who fear you turn to me,
those who understand your statutes.
May I wholeheartedly follow your decrees,
that I may not be put to shame.

Psalm 119:73-80

God is at work in the psalmist’s life having formed them in the first place, giving understanding, afflicting and comforting them. The difference God makes through God’s word in our lives is what people need from us. It can be a rocky road. We’re not going to walk it perfectly. But God’s hand and heart in our lives is what we need, and what others need to see in us. In and through Jesus.

 

oblivious to all else

ו Waw

May your unfailing love come to me, LORD,
your salvation, according to your promise;
then I can answer anyone who taunts me,
for I trust in your word.
Never take your word of truth from my mouth,
for I have put my hope in your laws.
I will always obey your law,
for ever and ever.
I will walk about in freedom,
for I have sought out your precepts.
I will speak of your statutes before kings
and will not be put to shame,
for I delight in your commands
because I love them.
I reach out for your commands, which I love,
that I may meditate on your decrees.

Psalm 119:41-48

God’s word is authoritative, and grants authority to God’s people, to God’s servants. Every one of God’s people have weaknesses and not one doesn’t have this or that struggle. But God’s word can lift each one of us above and beyond that. We come to realize that it’s the most important word on earth and beyond. So that we not only fear nothing else, but witness to it by telling others, and especially how we live, the change that word brings. In and through Jesus.

doing what is right or good in everyone’s eyes

Be careful to do what is right in the eyes of everyone.

Romans 12:17b

We live in a day and age when it’s impossible to do anything without it being politicized or criticized in one way or another. A big part of that is judgment imposed simply because of who one is either in political, religious, or other terms that don’t fit the mainstream of society. Yet we’re told to be careful to do what is right in the eyes of everyone. Bill Mounce’s translation (click link) says we’re to give careful thought to such.

The directive might be tied to what precedes it, the imperative not to repay anyone evil for evil done to us. But there’s no connective in the Greek, which we would translate “but.” So we can’t be sure. But regardless, we can see that it applies across the board, whatever we’re up against.

This seems like a tall if not impossible order. After all, just the fact that we’re from different backgrounds culturally one way or another makes it nearly certain that someone is bound to misunderstand us along the way, and take what we’re doing in a way that’s not at all intended. And there’s the reality that if we seek to witness to the truth of the gospel or for something we consider right, there will always be those who disagree or oppose us. In their eyes what we’re doing won’t be good or right at all.

I think we have to accept the fact that this is not foolproof, nor even entirely possible. So with that qualification, we can attempt to do what is right in the sight of everyone, even while doing things which we know in and of themselves won’t be accepted by everyone as good and right in themselves. How we do something, the sensitivity used is surely something of what Paul might have been getting at here.

That no one would speak badly about what we do would be the goal. That at least they can see that we’ve made the attempt to come across in a way that’s acceptable, and even good and right. Whatever else they might think about what we’re about, let’s bend over backwards to not have them stumble over something we do which is neither good nor right. In and through Jesus.

the gospel is what we’re to be living out, as well as witnesses to

We are not going too far in our boasting, as would be the case if we had not come to you, for we did get as far as you with the gospel of Christ. Neither do we go beyond our limits by boasting of work done by others. Our hope is that, as your faith continues to grow, our sphere of activity among you will greatly expand, so that we can preach the gospel in the regions beyond you.

2 Corinthians 10:14-16a

What seems beside the point in Paul’s addressing of his concern in passing, but really is at the heart of the point is what he was all about: not self-aggrandizement or self-glory, but only and always about the gospel of Christ.

Paul is getting after those who were set in opposition to him, claiming apostleship for themselves perhaps because they found themselves in opposition to Paul and somehow thought they could do better, or more likely out of an underlying self-ambition with a professed belief in Christ. But Paul wasn’t about self-ambition in the least, but again- only and always about Christ and Christ’s gospel.

Sometimes we may not feel we have anything to offer to others, or at least not anything they would accept. After all, people look at another according to their status, what they’ve achieved in life, or whether that other is beneficial to them, not to mention whether it all seems relevant or jives with them.

Paul was concerned about none of that, because the gospel is inherently weak and foolish in the world’s eyes, just as he had told them in his first letter to the Corinthian church. God takes the weak and despised and nothing things as his instruments to help others. The gospel is not only to be proclaimed, but lived out by those who proclaim it. Christ’s weakness in his death on the cross is to be embraced by his followers, that they might know God’s resurrection power in Christ. When we are strong in ourselves, then the only help people will get is what help we can give them, not God’s help.

And so we must continue on no matter what we’re facing or going through. Believing and knowing that we are on course only in the weakness of Christ for the good news that will bring others into the power and blessing of God. In and through Jesus.

the difference resurrection makes

So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.

2 Corinthians 4:18

Paul in his first letter to the Corinthians in our Bibles tells us that if Christ was not raised from the dead, then there’s no resurrection of the dead for us who believe in Christ, and our faith is then worthless (1 Corinthians 15:12-19). In the context (click link above), Paul is talking about fixing our eyes on what lies beyond the weakness of this present life. He makes it clear that in their following of Christ, the calling they had, their lives were on the line. This was especially true of Paul himself, who was the target of relentless attacks from those who opposed the gospel, those determined to see his life come to an end.

Today it is no less dangerous to be a Christian in some places, in fact one’s life or well being is in some way in jeopardy in many places (see Open Doors for information on this). And as I get older, I realize more and more that my days in this present life are less and less, that they are indeed numbered.

Paul encourages us to press on, fixing our eyes on what is to come in the resurrection, so that we are willing to risk it all for Christ in the present, and also so that we don’t see holding on to life as the end all, because it’s not for those of us who are “in Christ.”

Paul is not advocating a “grin and bare it” approach. Instead we’re to rejoice in the midst of our weaknesses and sufferings, because Christ and his life is present with us now, someday to be completed in no less than our resurrection when we receive our new body, raised with other believers to be presented to Christ to the glory of God.

In the mean time we live in bodily weakness, even for those of us who have a measure of good health. We enjoy God’s good creation, but we live as those who look to the new creation in Christ as present in this life for ourselves and others, and the promise in that when this life ends. In and through Jesus.

overcoming evil with good

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

Romans 12:21

There seems to be nothing more natural to us than responding to that which is not loving, or maybe even hateful with that which is less than love. We want to hold our ground, or at least protect ourselves. And besides, what right does anyone have to act the way they did? How in the world are we supposed to “overcome evil with good”? And just what does that mean? To understand, we have to look at the fuller context.

Do not repay anyone evil for evil. Be careful to do what is right in the eyes of everyone. If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone. Do not take revenge, my dear friends, but leave room for God’s wrath, for it is written: “It is mine to avenge; I will repay,” says the Lord. On the contrary:

“If your enemy is hungry, feed him;
if he is thirsty, give him something to drink.
In doing this, you will heap burning coals on his head.”

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

Romans 12:17-21

We’re to do good to others, even when it may seem to make no sense. What makes sense to us unfortunately is tit for tat, if you do me wrong, than I need to at the very least hold you at arm’s length, and likely I need in some way to retaliate. But what does Scripture say? Something quite different.

I don’t think it’s an accident that Romans 13:1-7 follows, the passage on God’s command to us to be subject to the state, governing authorities, who are obviously accountable to God to carry out their duty for our good, and for the good of society or people in general. So those who do evil are accountable to God in part by being accountable to the governing authorities, which in turn are themselves accountable to God.

But back to the main point: We don’t have to become best friends to those who are mistreating us. And this is not at all referring to abusive relationships where even our lives might be at stake, and certainly our well being. We need to get out of them, and look to the governing authorities when that’s needed. We can love from a distance through prayers, but keep our distance at the same time.

But in many cases our enemies will be those we have to put up with day after day, whether at work or someplace else.  We may not win them to Christ, but maybe we can win them to ourselves, and help them become open to the gospel message. Their incredulity might turn into something of a friendship during which they will see our lives, and the fact that our love for them is genuine. So that instead of God’s judgment, they might eventually receive his salvation. In and through Jesus.