the need for self-understanding

…we are dust.

Psalm 103:14b

It is important for us to understand ourselves. Weaknesses. What helps us, what doesn’t. Strengths, too. To find where we excel as well as what helps us be resilient in the inevitable drama and trauma of life. To find our gifts, what we enjoy doing, what comes more or less natural to us, as well as what doesn’t.

Scripture tells us we’re dust. And that to dust we’ll return. But in and through God become human in Christ we receive the hope in the form of a promise of resurrection from a mortal into an immortal existence. And we’re taken up into a great family, God our Parent, Christ our Brother, the Spirit our love breath.

I really get tired of certain aspects of myself which are not what I believe God intends in the long run. Especially challenging to me is my propensity to worry about this and that and something else, everything else. I manage this much better than in the past. I realize that it’s important how I carry myself, not to be fake, but in faith looking to God to help me do better, trust in God, cast the burden on God, and experience some release from this. And that is happening more for which I’m thankful, but I’m still beset with a tendency to worry. Scripture addresses that. Though that helps I simply realize that this is a weakness that is part of who I am.

Thankfully we find that God accepts us completely just as we are. That should be the reason we can do the same. God helps us in the midst of our weaknesses, indeed the Lord’s strength somehow becomes evident in our weakness (2 Corinthians 12).   If God loves this dust made in God’s image, then we need to, too. Love each other, even ourselves. Know ourselves, and that the God who knows us completely through and through, completely accepts and loves us.

In and through Jesus.

do not worry about anything

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:4-7

There is plenty to worry and be anxious about, and to fret over in the world. In our own worlds, close to home, and expanding from there our own neighborhoods, area, nation where we live, and from there, the entire earth. There is plenty to be concerned about.

But what are we told here? We’re told that we who are in Christ Jesus are not to worry (or be anxious: NIV, with other translations) about anything. Instead as we seek to rejoice in the Lord always, and let our gentleness be known to all, we’re to pray, voicing our concerns to God, and asking God to take care of them. Giving thanks for God’s help before. And just trusting in and knowing the God to whom we’re praying. God will take care of it.

That doesn’t mean we’re not in the works of God’s answer. But it does mean that ultimately the answer never comes from us, or because of us, but only from God. God may use a mediary such as an angel. God often does use others, or some resource to help us.

And we need to bring concerns to God in prayer this way as our first priority when concerns arise or our present. And keep doing that over time. Some will be projects in process, while others need to be attended to and taken care of.

The big point I want to make in this post is that we’re not to worry about anything at all. Yes, we want to be aware of everything, though some things will escape our notice. We can pray to God about that as well, whatever we might be unaware of. Yes, we want to do the best we can. But we’re meant to depend on God to help us through not just some things, but everything. And God does not want us to be passive in that, but active. It’s not at all like, “Well, we’re not to worry about anything, so I just won’t pay attention to anything.” No. We’re to be fully engaged, but in all of that to worry about nothing, because we know God has our backs, and every side. And that God will take care of it.

We need to let this soak into our hearts. As we no longer worry, God helping us, then we’ll begin to experience that peace of God which surpasses all understanding, beyond that. What is meant to replace our worry is God’s peace. To guard our hearts and minds. God will take care of everything as we commit all to him. In and through Jesus.

slow down

therefore thus says the Lord God,
See, I am laying in Zion a foundation stone,
a tested stone,
a precious cornerstone, a sure foundation:
“One who trusts will not panic.”

Isaiah 28:16

According to the NET Bible, the Hebrew is “‘will not hurry,’ i.e., act in panic.” If there’s one simple word I have to keep reminding myself again and again of perhaps more than any other, maybe it’s this: Slow down.

Our culture is caught up in hurry and worry tags close behind. When we’re in a hurry, most of the time we’re mostly taking matters in our own hands as if all depends on us. God is distant, for all practical purposes as far as we’re concerned out of the mix. My work demands some degree of haste. And all too easily one can develop that attitude the entire time.

But I find that God usually seems distant when I’m doing that, and especially after I’ve been in that mode for a while. And when I tell myself to slow down, it’s usually just a matter of time and not long at that, that some sense of God returns. 

Slowing down is similar to keeping in step with God, in the words of Scripture: walking with God, being guided by the Spirit. We want to be involved in God’s life, in God’s work, not merely our own. When we slow down, God overtakes us so that we can begin to live and move and realize that we have our being in God. In and through Jesus.

getting rid of worry (*and distraction*)

Now as they went on their way, he entered a certain village, where a woman named Martha welcomed him into her home. She had a sister named Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet and listened to what he was saying. But Martha was distracted by her many tasks; so she came to him and asked, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to do all the work by myself? Tell her then to help me.” But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things; there is need of only one thing.[a] Mary has chosen the better part, which will not be taken away from her.”

Luke 10:38-42

Our Lord’s words to a troubled, at this point exasperated Martha might be helpful to us, to those of us easily given to worry. It’s interesting how Jesus puts worry and distraction side by side in his reply to Martha. Her sister, Mary, who she was complaining about was attentive to the Lord’s teaching, sitting at his feet, taking it in. But Martha was busy doing what in her mind just had to be done. And feeling the burden and weight of that.

I notice in my own life that even the demands of life can blessedly remove me from what can too easily trouble me, that such demands are actually a blessing. But what is needed is to try to get to the root of the trouble. And key to defusing worry, or so it seems to me, is to not only get our minds off the problem, but onto the right things, even the solution, or maybe better put whatever focus God wants us to have.

Anxiety, worry and fear are signs that we’re likely distracted and not attentive to God’s word for us, to God. Yes, in our limitations and the difficulties of life now, we can’t just discount all fear and anxiety. But it seems to me that we can learn to disabuse ourselves of much of that, and by and by essentially all of it, if we learn to keep up the practice of attentiveness. Learning from Jesus about the love and care of our Heavenly Father (Parent), and how that touches on every single part of our lives, with no exceptions. I would like to add, we also need to want to get rid of the distractions which bother us.

Only God can give us the insight and wisdom we need. In and through Jesus.

no exceptions to God’s rule

My brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance; and let endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking in nothing.

James 1:2-4

Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his power. Put on the whole armor of God, so that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil.

Ephesians 6:10-11

I don’t ordinarily like to string Scripture passages together, but I think these passage can help us understand something of the devil’s tactics against us and how we struggle to think straight when it comes to God’s rule not only in general, but in our lives. There are no exceptions to God’s rule.

By rule I mean both God’s reign and the rule God lays down for that reign. For me, like I’ve said in posts before, I probably have struggled with anxiety and worry more than anything else. Although I’ve managed that better over the last year or more, I still long for more of a breakthrough in overcoming it.

God’s rule for us his children is that in whatever trial we’re in, we’re to consider it nothing but joy, and that we’re not to worry about anything, but instead we’re to pray with supplication- humble request, along with thanksgiving, we’re to make our requests known to God. With the promise that when we do that God’s peace which surpasses all understanding will guard our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

What we’re prone to do is make exceptions to God’s rule. The devil is in the details of that, just like in the story where the serpent challenges God’s word in the garden (Genesis 3). The same holds true for us today. The enemy and/or our own overactive mind will suggest to us that because we had at least some blame for such and such or whatever, that somehow, that no longer applies to God’s rule. This is when we need to discipline our minds and hearts to insist on keeping to what Scripture plainly says. Yes, in certain passages directly pertinent, as well as considering Scripture as a whole. We have a grace-filled, loving God who watches over us and not only can but will take care of it, will take care of everything if we just trust God.

We have to acclimate ourselves to the truth that there’s no exceptions to God’s rule. The enemy will be whispering, yelling, then again whispering in our ear that indeed there are some things which don’t apply. We have to resist the devil with the promise that he will flee from us (James 4:7).

There are no exceptions to God’s rule. We must hold on to that. God will help us. In and through Jesus.

don’t despise what’s simple (the example here for the anxious, like me)

Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:4-9

We can often look at the simple as simplistic. And maybe somehow beneath us? That may or may not be what we need to humble us. But whatever may be the case, we dare not discount and put aside what might seem too obvious, for something more sophisticated and complex, even if we think that our problem is complex. It surely is, but we need to remember too that what is simple is often quite profound.

And this is no less the case in the above Scripture passage. What if we like myself, who are so prone to anxiety would start to put this passage into practice? I know there might be some who would roll their eyes thinking that this is like using a precious promise book, strewn with maybe a hundred verses we’re supposed to claim. It would be good to read the entire book of Philippians, for sure, and meditate on it all, and we need to do that, too.

Remember, the exercise itself will be beneficial, even if one is still lost in anxiety. What is true about those who suffer anxiety as I have over the years, is that the real problem is not the problem itself, but the anxiety. If one is not anxious about one thing, they’ll be anxious about something else. When one anxiety is lifted, there will be another anxiety to take its place. And what one finds out is that basically the approach to life is to be anxious, more or less filled with anxiety.

Instead we need to take this simple yet not simplistic approach of mouthing the above Scripture passage, for example, maybe after we’ve memorized it. And seeking to put it into practice in the midst of our day. If we stay at it, we’ll find eventually that the cloud will lift, that God will honor that. Always in the context of a life in which we are committed to following the Lord. Yes, in view of the full letter of Philippians, and all the rest God has given and will give us. In and through Jesus.

learning to trust God/the Father in everything

Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding;
in all your ways submit to him,
and he will make your paths straight.

Proverbs 3:5-6

Trust God from the bottom of your heart;
don’t try to figure out everything on your own.
Listen for God’s voice in everything you do, everywhere you go;
he’s the one who will keep you on track.

Proverbs 3:5-6; MSG

None of us are going to be perfect in this life. We’ll lapse into this or that which is wrong. Though we really should be making progress. And hopefully leave the most hurtful, damaging sins behind, and get help with whatever addictions we have. There indeed ought to be substantial progress in our lives toward Christ-likeness together with others in Christ.

In my own life, though I’ve had other issues, probably far and away the one that has plagued me the longest, and been most endemic in my life is the anxiety issue, which a few times has bordered on panic. A feeling of depression might come in second, though I think for me, anxiety and nagging worry is the clear enough winner. I was glad for those times when it seemed either dissipated or absent, but more often than not, it was present in one form or another. I am surprised in talking with others just how common this is.

It seems to me that God might be trying to teach me a new radical trust. I’m not talking about sinless perfection, since there is none of that in this life. Instead what I’m referring to is a new habit of life, learned over time. The Scripture quoted above from Proverbs might seem idealistic and really beyond our reach in this life. But really? Didn’t Jesus both exemplify and teach us to trust the Father without reservation (Matthew 6:25-34)? Again, we won’t do that perfectly in this life, and even when we have our times of doing it better, we’ll certainly flub up along the way.

I think what the Father wants us to get accustomed to and acclimated with is the idea that he’ll take care of us, he’ll take care of everything. That we need to and indeed can settle into that reality, and develop a new disposition corresponding to that. And that if we don’t trust the Father in one particular matter, then we’re failing to trust him. This isn’t at all like an Authoritarian ready to beat us with a club if we don’t trust them. But a most loving, caring Father.

This hit home to me, because there are a number of matters about our house which have given me grave, likely a bit of undue or overblown concern, but real issues, nonetheless. It probably doesn’t help for me to downplay them, because then trust in God really isn’t going to matter that much. It’s not like I should be negligent in what I know I need to do, or have to do. And I’m not. But does involve weighing everything, and trusting God with the resources God gives us to make good decisions. And above all, for the likes of me, to simply trust God. A simple trust. That God will work things out, that I not only need not worry and fret. But that indeed, I should not. That God will take care of it, whatever that ends up involving on my part. All of this as with everything else in and through Jesus.

the very hairs of our head are numbered

Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather, be afraid of the One who can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care. And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.

Matthew 10:28-31

We in Jesus need to live as if the words of Jesus are true. Here within the context of potentially dangerous mission, we’re told not to be afraid. That the Father’s care for his children is down to the last detail, even the number of hairs on our head. We need to let that sink in when we’re worrying about this or that. Granted, that thought might be taken out of context, but since we’re God’s children, in whatever circumstance we’re in, it applies.

Does the Father love us or not? And just what does that mean? Can we rest assured in him regardless of what’s we’re facing? I think sometimes we just have to take a deep breath and say to ourselves that no matter how we feel, or what we’re thinking, we are committed to the truth that is in Jesus. And part of the heart of that truth is God’s immense, immeasurable love for his children. I want to add too that God loves the world with all of God’s heart, which is seen in the cross. But to enter into that love out of the destruction and curse of our own ways, we must commit ourselves to faith in Christ, simply trusting in him, and God’s gift of salvation in him.

But back to the main point: God- the Father in Christ with the Spirit- loves, and has a special family love for those who have been born from above, and adopted into God’s family. So no matter what, we must commit ourselves to that. The sense that comes with that will come to us, as we hold on by faith. But we also need to remember that within this is a world of grace, God’s grace meaning gift and favor, which is greater than any “true” thought or fear we might have. Instead of this having reasons because of us, though I do believe God loves all he has created, it is also like “Just because.” I love Ted, or put your name in the blank, just because, and with all my heart.” But that also includes the wonder in God’s creation of all of us and his personal delight in design of and for us to more than fit into his family. We need to learn to go with that, out of our fear into God’s immense and personal love for each and everyone of us. In and through Jesus.

not above worry

Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.

1 Peter 5:7

Live carefree before God; he is most careful with you.

1 Peter 5:7; MSG

Not long ago I wrote a post which has helped me up to this time to refuse worry, holding it at bay while I try to see the bigger picture. The emphasis in the post was that through God’s grace and provision to us, we’re to make the effort needed to grow, and as that letter says in the end, to grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ (2 Peter).

I love the thought from Eugene Peterson’s rendering of this passage, the idea of living carefree before God. God is careful, or full of care in the right way over us, and will take care of whatever troubles us. It almost seems like this is something that we simply much choose to do.

I’ve noticed in my own life that when I get back in the worrying mode, I just go on from one gnawing concern to another. No sooner do I get out, or break free than another one is either on me, or just around the corner. I remember years ago that when I wasn’t worrying about something, I was kind of like worrying when the next worry would hit me.

Contrast that to simply choosing to live carefree before God. Or as the more literal translation says, to cast all our anxiety on God. So that it requires our effort, but is also something we simply live in. That’s when I’ve found that once again I can hold worries at bay. Refusing to receive them so that I simply live anxiety free.  That makes an amazing difference in being able to receive and appreciate God’s good gift and goodness to us in Jesus. Either I think I have to be uptight, or believe God will take care of whatever the concern is.

So it’s one or the other. We’ll live in anxiety and worry over one thing after the next. Or we’ll refuse to do that, instead casting our cares on God so that we can live carefree lives before him. I suppose for many, there’s something in between. I am beginning, I think to understand that it’s better to simply live in God’s peace no matter what happens, then to not live in that peace while supposedly avoiding trouble. Problems, trouble, even trials are unavoidable in this life.

I have managed my anxiety issues better in the past months. But with the recent post mentioned above had basically broken free from it altogether, little more than a week, ha. I want to go on now, trusting the Lord will be with me to help me deal responsibly with situations, hopefully with his wisdom and not my own understanding (Proverbs 3:5-6). Just to live within the normal tension of life, but more and more experiencing that peace of God that surpasses our understanding (Philippians 4:6-7). In and through Jesus.

deal with today’s concerns, not tomorrow’s

Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Matthew 6:34

So don’t worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring its own worries. Today’s trouble is enough for today.

Matthew 6:34; NLT

Give your entire attention to what God is doing right now, and don’t get worked up about what may or may not happen tomorrow. God will help you deal with whatever hard things come up when the time comes.

Matthew 6:34; MSG

Yesterday at work I had a crushing burden which just seemed to be beyond all common sense about something which is going to happen soon, not earthshaking, but detailed. I thought of our Lord’s words inviting us who are weighed down to come to him and take his yoke on us, an easy yoke. And I thought of the passages telling us to cast our burdens on God. So I did my best to cast my burden on the Lord in my poor prayer.

After some period of time, the above passage came to me, and the weight was lifted off, and I felt a peace, and with that the longing to live in the Lord’s peace that he gives us. I was reminded how it’s not just enough to take our Lord’s yoke on us. But that part of learning from him as we take on that yoke, is receiving his words from other parts of Scripture. Taking them to heart and life. Seeking to live there.

Something I’ll be continuing to try to do and keep growing in along with others in and through Jesus.