what’s our condition?

“The Holy Spirit spoke the truth to your ancestors when he said through Isaiah the prophet:

“‘Go to this people and say,
“You will be ever hearing but never understanding;
you will be ever seeing but never perceiving.”
For this people’s heart has become calloused;
they hardly hear with their ears,
and they have closed their eyes.
Otherwise they might see with their eyes,
hear with their ears,
understand with their hearts
and turn, and I would heal them.’

Acts 28:25b-27

It’s a scary thought, but we’re not above developing a hard heart or seared conscience (1 Timothy 4:2). When darkness seems light, and what is bad seems good (Isaiah 5:20). I think we’re there to a large extent in our society and world today, although it’s surely nothing new except in the forms it is taking. There does seem to be a sea change in terms of morality. A popular idea is that as long as it doesn’t hurt someone else, whatever one does is fine. But that fails to take into account the truth that sin harms us, and through that harm, ends up harming others. Of course nowadays sin is thought to be an outdated concept, just like good and evil. God is not in all our thoughts (Psalm 10:4), and that explains the condition we’re in.

Christians are not exempt. We’re told that we’re to hold on to faith and a good conscience, otherwise our faith might be shipwrecked (1 Timothy 1:19).

There is recovery of sight for the blind, and hearing for the deaf through Christ. He can open our eyes and ears, so that we might hear his voice and follow. And have a spiritual aptitude we can develop and grow in through the Spirit and the word. Christians need to show the way, and we do so in love for God and our neighbor, and in faithfulness to the gospel in our own lives, so that what we do and say can help others. As we are helped ourselves in and through Jesus.

 

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“the redemption of reason”

The wise will be put to shame;
they will be dismayed and trapped.
Since they have rejected the word of the Lord,
what kind of wisdom do they have?

Jeremiah 8:9

In a challenging, but interesting article, Dallas Willard speaks of a crisis of reason not only in the universities, but right in our Christian schools. Aptly called, “The Redemption of Reason,” because Willard is making the point that sin through bad philosophy has shipwrecked reason, so that it is now essentially meaningless. And what has gone down with it is any idea of moral knowledge. All lost because it has been separated from its source and ground, or place, from God who is spirit, and why creation exists in the first place (my words in part here; I would highly recommend a slow read of that article).

The Bible is essentially reasonable, even when we can’t track with all that is happening entirely. Taken as a whole, then considered in its parts, we can say without a doubt that there is plenty of sense in the story, whether or not it jives with all of our sensibilities. The problem nowadays is that our outlook has been shaped from centuries of what amounts to essentially bad philosophy in different forms, which end up denying truth because they’re untethered from the one source of truth, God. And so we go gallivanting, who knows where.

Religion is looked down on as something like old school. Of course the one revelation is fulfilled in Christ and the good news in him as unfolded from the pages of Scripture. Reason is very much apart of our faith, essentially Christ’s resurrection in history at the center of that, along with the reality of God mediated to us in Christ by the Spirit.

Where does that leave us? In a crisis even in our Christian circles, because we’ve by and large retreated from reason because of how it is understandably failing in the secular universities. We have done so by placing our study and appropriation of Scripture in a separate category probably without knowing it, because we have to make do in the real world. And Scripture seems different, anyhow. Well it is, and it isn’t. It’s from God, but it’s right down to earth where we live in our humanity. And that certainly includes reason.

Again what’s needed is nothing less than the redemption of reason, according to Willard. And Christians must lead the way, or show the way, because reason itself loses all significance apart from God, and won’t stand on its own, completely dependent on the meaning assigned to it. It’s not like we have to figure out the problem; it’s in the air, just assumed, grounded somehow in whatever human endeavor, good things like science, which essentially can’t be the basis of meaning since God is not in their equation.

So we shouldn’t flee from reason, or be apologetic about it. Instead we need to demonstrate through faith the reasonableness of it all, while at the same time holding on to mystery as part of the story, what’s up, and what God is doing in our lives and in the world. And see the gospel in Jesus as essential in all of this, leading us to God and the new life in him.

an old standby: the need to pray when in need

Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. He said: “In a certain town there was a judge who neither feared God nor cared what people thought. And there was a widow in that town who kept coming to him with the plea, ‘Grant me justice against my adversary.’

“For some time he refused. But finally he said to himself, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care what people think, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will see that she gets justice, so that she won’t eventually come and attack me!’”

And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?”

Luke 18:1-8

Prayer is something Christians often struggle with. As time goes on we likely pray more, but may feel that we pray less. Part of that I would guess is the growing sense we have of our need to pray. Ongoing growth means less satisfaction with where we’re at, whereas in our early days in Christ we simply enjoyed basking in the new found light and warmth of the Lord, finding that new life quite moving and revolutionary. It was in part God treating us as infants before “pruning” (John 15) us for growth.

Not that later on we can’t be relatively prayerless. Unfortunately we can, but I think the norm for those who are intentional in growing as Christians is to keep on praying, and gradually grow in doing so. Our inner poverty on the one hand can discourage us from praying, but on the other hand, can help us pray more, as we look to God for help.

In Jesus’s parable above, he is encouraging his disciples and us to persist in prayer, to pray and not give up. We’re to keep on praying no matter what, through good times, bad times, and everything in between. The context is especially when one is running up against need, even great need. The widow was in trouble, even in dire straits. And our Lord’s answer for us when we’re in a similar place: always pray and not give up.

Justice is in the picture. On the one hand, it’s not like we’re deserving of God’s help. And we’re often at least partly to blame for the predicament we’re in. But God is more than ready to give us what we need to do well and honor him in whatever situation we’re in. For too many Christians in the world, yes, injustice is rampant against them. They need our active love and prayers. And for us, yes, we need God’s help, as we try to work through difficult places in a way that both receives and dispenses what is right and just and good.

Note in Jesus’s parable the widow’s plea to the unjust judge was nothing fancy. It was a petition, indeed cry for help. We need not worry about some perceived need for some kind of fanciful churchy prayer language. We simply cry out in our own way of saying things. Yes, appealing to God’s promises in Scripture. But not holding back. Always praying and never giving up. Believing that God will grant justice, that God will help us in time of need. In and through Jesus.

 

the good of boredom

It seems like in this day and age that entertainment is something everyone thinks they have to have at just about any moment. It’s at the tip of our fingers on our phones, for me not on the phone, but with classical music which I more or less prefer most all the time. Though often actually beautiful, not necessarily exciting so as to break through what boredom I may have.

I should give my definition of boredom. Something like simply finding something monotonous or tedious. But add to that our reaction. For me when I know I have to do something, I don’t let boredom affect me in the least. But I do have my small Bible at hand, with either coffee (or tea) nearby. But I find that even going through Scripture, and especially on a regular basis can seem boring since I often enough am not connecting firsthand, even if what I’m reading I might find interesting.

Perhaps the book of Ecclesiastes is the best book in Scripture for considering boredom. After all, the “Teacher” says all is meaningless. But in the midst of their turmoil also concludes that one should simply settle down and enjoy the gifts God gives in the normal everyday routine.

I somehow wonder if our penchant for excitement isn’t in and of itself idolatrous. It’s like we have to have this or that pleasure or whatever to satisfy ourselves. When God is the one who is ultimately to be our Satisfaction. Not to downgrade the enjoyment we should have from the gifts we receive from God.

I’m wondering if boredom prepares and opens us up to receive what we need from God. And it reminds me of Augustine’s words:

You have made us for yourself, and our hearts are restless until they rest in you.

If we’re no longer bored because of something other than God, or in thankfulness receiving all of life as a gift from God, then we’re better off being bored. I live in boredom myself, and don’t mind it at all. It’s not like I don’t enjoy God’s gifts, and hopefully live in the enjoyment of God himself. Nor is it like my boredom isn’t telling against me to some extent. But I accept it as part of this life. Somehow a necessary preparation for growth in grace now, and for the change to come in the next life. In and through Jesus.

to remain in worship

Though the fig tree does not bud
and there are no grapes on the vines,
though the olive crop fails
and the fields produce no food,
though there are no sheep in the pen
and no cattle in the stalls,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord,
I will be joyful in God my Savior.

The Sovereign Lord is my strength;
he makes my feet like the feet of a deer,
he enables me to tread on the heights.

For the director of music. On my stringed instruments.

Habakkuk 3:17-19

Habakkuk (audio) is one of my favorite biblical books, though each and everyone is just as important in its place. Habakkuk is helpful to me, because it challenges God over God’s leading, will, and work. It seemed to Habakkuk that God did not make sense in terms of what God was doing at the time. Habakkuk wanted life to make sense in a world bent against God and God’s will. And it was certainly personal to Habakkuk, who stood as one of God’s prophets, proclaiming God’s word, often of God’s judgment in anticipation of God’s justice and salvation. But what was to unfold according to God’s word given to him as we see in the book seemed to make a mockery of justice. That God would use Babylon which engaged in practices more evil than the nation God was punishing, his own people Israel, made absolutely no sense to Habakkuk.

This single thought, to be taken from the book as a whole, is vitally important, if we’re to be true worshipers of God. Habakkuk ends up being a book of worship, though it is in the process of working through real life that Habakkuk finally gets to that. And part of that process was questioning God.

God did answer, and that’s vitally important for us today. We have God’s answer in spades, when you consider not only the book of Habakkuk, but the entire Book of the Bible. And yet to live through the process, not to mention to try to get our heads around it, or more likely, just to try to begin to understand it, is really beyond us. We need God’s grace and help for sure.

But there’s nothing more important for us as God’s people in Jesus than to be true worshipers of God. To remain in that posture, we will have to work through challenges to God’s goodness and greatness. But it’s vital to us that we are committed to being worshipers of God, come what may. The thought Habakkuk closes with, quoted above. In and through Jesus.

worship of God as our first priority in the midst of life

Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor. “All this I will give you,” he said, “if you will bow down and worship me.”

Jesus said to him, “Away from me, Satan! For it is written: ‘Worship the Lord your God, and serve him only.’”

Then the devil left him, and angels came and attended him.

Matthew 4:8-11

Worship of God is held in the highest esteem in scripture. And yet it’s not simple to define or describe. And we all too often are at a loss to understand what it really means in our lives and practices, even as professed followers of Jesus. Jesus was certainly a worshiper of God, of his Father, but in the mystery of the Trinity, as we see from the New Testament, received worship himself.

Worship has been described as giving worth-ship to God, how the English word was derived. From scripture it is in terms of awe and proper reverential fear. It is the human response to God’s greatness and goodness. And by grace, it is the response of love to Love, entrusting one’s whole life and being into God’s hands and seeking to live that out in every way in our lives. Worship surely does not exclude any part of our humanity, or the gifts God has given us. We receive such gifts, but reserve adoration, thanks and praise to the Giver. We refuse to allow any of those things to occupy what is not fitting for them, while appreciating and enjoying them for what they are. God is in a category other than all else. Ironically, as we give God that due, we can love and appreciate all God’s gifts in a more pure, complete sense.

To be worshipers of God individually and together ought to be our goal as followers of Christ. That should be our expressed purpose and passion. Surely Jesus was bereft in feelings after fasting in the wilderness for forty days and nights. At least Jesus did not refer to his feelings, but to God’s word when refuting Satan in making it clear that humans are to worship only God. Of course the first of the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:3).

Only God can help us “get it” at all. As Jesus said, the Father is looking for worshipers, and such worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth (John 4:23-24). We need the Spirit and the word to help us, and we also need the community of the redeemed, the church (Ephesians 3:14-21).

If we concentrate on worshiping God, the rest will come much easier, I’m supposing. Not to say that life all the sudden will become easier, or we’ll arrive in any kind of sinless state. But we will be helped immensely, and be a help much more, if we can just begin to get our feet on the ground in seeking to be worshipers of God. In and through Jesus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

trusting in God at all times

Trust in him at all times, you people;
pour out your hearts to him,
for God is our refuge.

Psalm 62:8

There are times which especially seem to test our faith in God. Somehow our belief in God’s goodness can correlate with whether or not things are working out as we might expect. Even when in this life, we can be sure that often things will not.

God’s goodness is above and beyond circumstances. And God’s goodness and greatness go together. So that regardless of the mistakes we make, and less than the best choices, and even grievous sins along the way, provided we repent, or try to learn from our mistakes, and even when we fail to, God remains God. Life remains an existence in this broken, sin-cursed world. We can’t expect either to change. Just because God is great and God is good, as scripture says, doesn’t mean that life under the sun in this present existence will not be without its difficulties, disappointments, and indeed dilemmas, not to mention dangers, along the way, as scripture says.

We’re called to trust in God at all times, which often is not easy for us in the midst of our trials and own weakness. But that’s God’s call to us. And an important part of that is expectations. God is always great and always good, and will be at work in everything for our good, as we trust in him, and live according to his will. But all the rest, including we ourselves, is limited at best, and flawed to the point of broken, at worst. It is healthy to realize both, clearly evident in scripture and life.

So God is great and good, and life under the sun has difficulty mixed in with goodness, and will have its problems all the way through. We are called to trust in God at all times in this existence, and to pour out our hearts to him in prayer. With the promise and reality that God is our refuge. It is God to whom we go, and in whom we trust. And we need to do so, just as the psalm tells us, to find our rest in him, no matter what. In and through Jesus.