truth is stranger than fiction

For the director of music. To the tune of “The Doe of the Morning.” A psalm of David.

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?
Why are you so far from saving me,
so far from my cries of anguish?
My God, I cry out by day, but you do not answer,
by night, but I find no rest.

Yet you are enthroned as the Holy One;
you are the one Israel praises.
In you our ancestors put their trust;
they trusted and you delivered them.
To you they cried out and were saved;
in you they trusted and were not put to shame.

But I am a worm and not a man,
scorned by everyone, despised by the people.
All who see me mock me;
they hurl insults, shaking their heads.
“He trusts in the Lord,” they say,
“let the Lord rescue him.
Let him deliver him,
since he delights in him.”

Yet you brought me out of the womb;
you made me trust in you, even at my mother’s breast.
From birth I was cast on you;
from my mother’s womb you have been my God.

Do not be far from me,
for trouble is near
and there is no one to help.

Many bulls surround me;
strong bulls of Bashan encircle me.
Roaring lions that tear their prey
open their mouths wide against me.
I am poured out like water,
and all my bones are out of joint.
My heart has turned to wax;
it has melted within me.
My mouth is dried up like a potsherd,
and my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth;
you lay me in the dust of death.

Dogs surround me,
a pack of villains encircles me;
they pierce my hands and my feet.
All my bones are on display;
people stare and gloat over me.
They divide my clothes among them
and cast lots for my garment.

But you, Lord, do not be far from me.
You are my strength; come quickly to help me.
Deliver me from the sword,
my precious life from the power of the dogs.
Rescue me from the mouth of the lions;
save me from the horns of the wild oxen.

I will declare your name to my people;
in the assembly I will praise you.
You who fear the Lord, praise him!
All you descendants of Jacob, honor him!
Revere him, all you descendants of Israel!
For he has not despised or scorned
the suffering of the afflicted one;
he has not hidden his face from him
but has listened to his cry for help.

From you comes the theme of my praise in the great assembly;
before those who fear you I will fulfill my vows.
The poor will eat and be satisfied;
those who seek the Lord will praise him—
may your hearts live forever!

All the ends of the earth
will remember and turn to the Lord,
and all the families of the nations
will bow down before him,
for dominion belongs to the Lord
and he rules over the nations.

All the rich of the earth will feast and worship;
all who go down to the dust will kneel before him—
those who cannot keep themselves alive.
Posterity will serve him;
future generations will be told about the Lord.
They will proclaim his righteousness,
declaring to a people yet unborn:
He has done it!

Psalm 22

Experiencing what we’re going through right now in the United States and the world does bring to my mind the accounts in Scripture, and especially in the Revelation (symbolic though much of it is), and helps me see just how the world can be shut down, and how vulnerable the world economy, the economy of all the nations actually is. Covid-19 is not something to be blinked at; it is indeed dangerous. But one can at least imagine worse viruses, and scientists have been warning us that these things will happen, so that we need to try to be better prepared for them.

Psalm 22 speaks of great suffering, but then a great ending. Bible students will easily recognize scenes from Christ’s suffering here. But then the vision goes to God’s blessing. It seems to make little sense.

But when we factor in the reality that the gospel is about life coming from death, specifically new life, that of the new creation in Christ, then we can start putting two and two together. And somehow Christ’s sufferings, though once for all accomplishing salvation and the beginning of this new life, go on in us, those who are “in Christ” in this existence.

Going over this psalm recently, I was struck how it seems to me that truth is often stranger than fiction. The truth we find in Scripture may often seem strange to us, and of course I call it truth because I’ve accepted it as such by faith. And by faith have come into the “blessed assurance” that it brings. But we will find that it rings true and exposes all that is a fraud, all that’s false. But to see that requires faith and time.

Thanks be to God (I would say, thank God, and mean it, but too often that comes across to me as too much like, “Oh God”) for what he accomplished and will accomplish in and through Jesus.

participation in God’s victory in Christ

For the director of music. A psalm of David.

May the Lord answer you when you are in distress;
may the name of the God of Jacob protect you.
May he send you help from the sanctuary
and grant you support from Zion.
May he remember all your sacrifices
and accept your burnt offerings.
May he give you the desire of your heart
and make all your plans succeed.
May we shout for joy over your victory
and lift up our banners in the name of our God.

May the Lord grant all your requests.

Now this I know:
The Lord gives victory to his anointed.
He answers him from his heavenly sanctuary
with the victorious power of his right hand.
Some trust in chariots and some in horses,
but we trust in the name of the Lord our God.
They are brought to their knees and fall,
but we rise up and stand firm.
Lord, give victory to the king!
Answer us when we call!

Psalm 20

On a surface reading, Psalm 20 appears to be about anyone and for anyone. And to some extent that’s true. But we have to see it in terms of its fulfillment in Christ. A number of things are noteworthy for us when we do.

I would like to focus, though, on one thing. The hope expressed that God would give them the desire of their heart. I see this both collectively and individually. What is our heart’s desire?

When I consider this in terms of God’s fulfillment in Christ, I can see how Christ’s heart’s desire is given to us more and more as we grow in him. His heart’s desire was to do the will of his Father, and to give his life completely for us, yes, as a sacrifice, in sacrificial death, that through that death we might live in his new resurrection life.

And Christ prays for us. God does grant all of his requests. We need to hold on to truth like that. And realize that on the basis of what God has done and is doing for us in Christ, we can indeed participate even for the life of the world (John 6). In and through Jesus.

the end of the last enemy

The Lord lives! Praise be to my Rock!
Exalted be God my Savior!
He is the God who avenges me,
who subdues nations under me,
who saves me from my enemies.
You exalted me above my foes;
from a violent man you rescued me.
Therefore I will praise you, Lord, among the nations;
I will sing the praises of your name.

He gives his king great victories;
he shows unfailing love to his anointed,
to David and to his descendants forever.

Psalm 18:46-50

For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet. The last enemy to be destroyed is death.

1 Corinthians 15:25-26

God is going to take care of all the enemies of humankind: the basics of that being sin and death. We see proof of that in the incarnation, life, death and resurrection of Christ, along with his ascension and the promise of his return.

None of us look forward to death, unless one is quite sick. We don’t. But it’s a fact of life, and the sooner we can reconcile with that, the better. At the same time we don’t have to fear, because Christ has taken the sting out of death, and made it the gateway into life, eternal life, by his death on the cross.

“Where, O death, is your victory?
Where, O death, is your sting?”

The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God! He gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

1 Corinthians 15:55-57

We win, included in that victory, the last enemy to be destroyed: death itself, in and through Jesus.

 

 

the way of the cross

Then he called the crowd to him along with his disciples and said: “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life[a] will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me and for the gospel will save it. What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul? If anyone is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will be ashamed of them when he comes in his Father’s glory with the holy angels.”

Mark 8:34-38

When we evangelicals think of the cross, we think of the salvation God provided for us, for humanity through Christ’s death and resurrection. And that’s so vitally important, no doubt. But we don’t often think of it in terms of a way of life for us in Christ. We might possibly write that off as true for his disciples when Jesus was headed to Jerusalem to face death. But we somehow against what we see follows in the New Testament and in history ignore the idea that the cross applies to us now. But in Christ we’re called to a cruciform or cross-shaped life.

The question becomes where do we find life? For many that’s in this world, and being successful in it, as well as enjoying much of its allure in what it has to offer. But for us in Christ there’s no turning back. There’s one way, the way of the cross, the way of Christ. And in that we find the true life.

 

living in a different world

Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called when you made your good confession in the presence of many witnesses.

1 Timothy 6:12b

It is one thing to believe with the promise of eternal life. It’s another thing to take hold of the eternal life, as Paul is saying here to Timothy. What this amounts to is living in a different world with feet solidly on the ground in the real world. And what’s involved in that is the presence of Christ in the world found in the church, the body of Christ. The groundbreaking for that was in Christ’s resurrection from the dead bringing the new life into the world destined to transform everything: the new creation in Christ.

Thankfully for us in Christ the real world is rooted in Christ. What is passing away seems front and center now, but not to us. What is front and center for us is nothing more and nothing less than the new creation in Christ. We live in a different world entirely. But to do so we too need to take hold of that world by faith. To live in that so that it permeates our lives through and through. But meant for this world, invading and somehow impacting the world through the presence and life of Christ in us. That others might see and believe. With impact on culture and judgment and final salvation to come. In and through Jesus.

 

an early Christian hymn

Beyond all question, the mystery from which true godliness springs is great:

He appeared in the flesh,
    was vindicated by the Spirit,
was seen by angels,
    was preached among the nations,
was believed on in the world,
    was taken up in glory.

1 Timothy 3:16

What is the difference for the Christian? What enables us toward true godliness? The simple answer is Christ, and Christ in his coming. What we celebrate at Christmas. And what we see in Christ in his incarnation, life and ministry of teaching and healing, his death and resurrection, his ascension and the Spirit being poured out, and the promise of his return when what he has accomplished will be completed.

The hymn like any good hymn gives us a particular focus. And the focus is on Christ himself, and the events and impact of that on the world. That makes all the difference. In and through Jesus.

 

 

 

“God is good” confirmed by the incarnation and resurrection

The claim that God is good is seen over and over again in the Bible. And God’s people took it by faith that such was the case, seen in God’s mighty acts, such as the deliverance of Israel from the Egyptian army by the parting and collapse of the Red Sea. So they could take it be faith that such was the case, God demonstrating it by signs and wonders for the protection and preservation of his people

But ultimately it would be challenging to make a case that God is good if we didn’t have the rest of the story. After all, God’s people did not live up to their calling, even after their return from exile. And generation after generation came and went essentially doing no better. Even with God’s calling and help, humans would inevitably fail him.

Enter into this picture something that was never imagined. The God, yes the God actually becoming completely human. Unfathomable, something that doesn’t make the least bit of sense. And yet true. Shockingly true. What in Christian theology is called the Incarnation: God becoming flesh, or human through the Son coming into the world, born of a woman in miraculous conception by the Holy Spirit, yet no different than any other fetus. Though still God, completely human.

In that we see how seriously God takes our plight. God comes to our rescue, not from the outside, but from inside, becoming one of us. God-with-us, yes, but as one of us. Of course without sin, and a unique being indeed: God-human. Completely human with undiminished deity, but human. To show us by his life and teaching how he is the fulfillment of God’s promise to bring in God’s kingdom. Jesus.

But this happens in another completely unexpected, unanticipated way: Through Jesus’s death on the dreaded, despised Roman cross, would come God’s breakthrough to defeat Satan, more than save humanity, and ultimately bring in a new world through the new creation. That death spelled the end of death through Jesus’s resurrection from the dead.

“God is good” is thus confirmed, which means we can thank God for every blessing, knowing that what we see now with all the danger and despair is not the end. God’s goodness will leave nothing untouched in the end through the full judgment and salvation Jesus achieved at the cross, when he returns. All the repentant, believing, faithful will know that all is well, at last fully at home in the eternal life and new creation of the Triune God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. In and through Jesus.