“more joy/less anxiety”

Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God,which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me—put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:4-9

I thought I pretty much had the beast of anxiety under control, not that I had arrived on that score. That has been the sin of default to which I can always fall into at any time, but which I think I am handling better even when it comes and takes over. But better yet is to somehow not let it get into the doorway or entry point of one’s heart and life in the first place. But that thought has seemed to me more fantasy and fiction than anything else. It just doesn’t seem to work in the real world. And yet I know better, both in terms of scripture, and even with reference to science in how the brain works, specifically neuroscience. But especially because I believe there is a God who has quite specific promises in this direction, the most direct on this issue in the passage quoted above.

Back to the first point: So I had worked three 13 hour days and was naturally tired, more drowsy than I imagined, and of course I wasn’t all that concerned about a message on anxiety, though I was definitely interested. Naturally according to script, I dozed off, and in this case probably missed almost half the message, more or less. So as I do if I doze off at all, I’ll watch the message later.

Yesterday while doing some work around the house, a thought hit me over a matter I thought was resolved, and I couldn’t shake it and anxiety was taking over. I knew that later when I would have the time to watch it, I would be completely all ears when listening to this message on anxiety. And I’m thankful that there will be a series on anxiety after Thanksgiving. It came across to me as the best message I’ve heard on the subject. I would highly recommend this message from Pastor Jeff Manion of Ada Bible Church, the one in the series on Philippians: Choosing Joy Under Pressure, week 9: more joy/less anxiety.

The message in a nutshell: see the text above, and consider your view of God and your focus on God’s generosity (or failure to see well, and do this), how that affects your demeanor and conduct, how we’re to simply pray so that we’ll receive God’s peace, what our thought life is to be like with reference to what we take in during the course of a day. And how we’re to follow Paul’s example in all of this, Paul who was incarcerated at the time, awaiting trial before an unpredictable emperor, Nero, so that depending on how the emperor was doing he might be released or executed. And yet knew joy, as this letter makes clear, helping a struggling church. That summarizes the message, but misses so much.

So this is something I will continue to work on. I’m in process, but looking forward to a growth which takes on more and more joy, and less and less anxiety in and through Jesus.

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God’s promise of strength for the day

and your strength will equal your days.

Deuteronomy 33:25

In Moses’s final blessing for Israel before he died, these words are noteworthy in his specific blessing for the tribe Asher. And we are told that all of the promises of God are yes and amen for us in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:20). In other words we can somehow lay claim to them, either directly or indirectly. The original promise was given to a people, but surely individuals are included in that blessing.

In my case, I’m facing a new work schedule which for me so far has been challenging due to its longevity, and the short window of time I have in between work days during that time frame of the week. Necessary sleep at any age, but perhaps especially at my age is important. We have to take care of ourselves. We are physical beings, as well as spiritual. It is one thing to have a sleep deprived night for a good reason, such as an emergency, but even then some recovery is called for. But when we do this night after night, young or old, we’re setting ourselves up for either poor health, or an accident, perhaps both.

I haven’t slept enough in my life, and I’ve probably drank more than my share of coffee. But I’m realizing, especially after I talked with one of my sisters who struggles with her sleep as well, that I really have to make getting adequate sleep a priority the rest of my life. Which for me at this time means trying to get 6 or more hours of sleep, and when I can, more.

So God’s promise here is not an excuse for us to fail to take care of ourselves. The promise here is not only physical, but spiritual, and perhaps primarily so. Physical and spiritual were essentially one in the Hebrew way of thinking, the former derived from the latter, as we see clearly in the strange story of Samson.

For us in Jesus, we find the Lord’s strength in our weakness, to be sure. And that might include not getting enough sleep now and then. But we do our best to be good stewards of the life God has given us, which includes taking care of our bodies. And we have God’s promise that our strength will equal the days God gives us, a part of his blessing to us that we might be a blessing, in and through Jesus.

learning to live with disappointment, finding God in the picture

It is interesting again and again how life doesn’t end up the way we had half way anticipated or hoped, or were even led to believe. We might think that God has disappeared, and is not in the picture. And it can seem that what we have left is okay, yet still disappointing, or even at times not desirable at all.

What we need to look for in faith is how God might be directing and working. Faith does not exclude an imaginative, certainly prayerful look into what is and what might be. Not diminishing what is missing, but looking at what remains, and the possibilities in that.

Above all, it is a case of learning to rest in God’s promises and will in Jesus. Believing not only in God’s goodness, but his purposes at work in everything, for the gospel. We have to hang on and look, pray and keep looking. And learn to acclimate ourselves to change, and unexpected outcomes.

God’s will will prevail. The question becomes just how much of that working of God we will be a part of. Of course it’s all by grace, nothing more nor less. We need to rest in that, ready to do our part when the time and opportunity comes. As God’s purposes in Jesus continue on through the gospel. In and through Jesus.

faith when we can’t see

By faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going.

Hebrews 11:8

Sometimes in the midst of life, we feel like we’re in a place in which we’re not sure what is going on, or the exact outcome. Perhaps this is during a time of significant changes. And life always includes difficulties which result from living in an incomplete, broken world, our own limitations and shortcomings contributing to that.

That is when we need to grasp and hold on to the same kind of faith our father Abraham had. We continue faithful as best we know to the calling God has given us, to what’s in front of us, obedient to the Lord, even when we lack the kind of certainty most of us would like. We can learn to rest assured in God’s promise, confident in his protection and care, and ultimately of a good outcome, honoring to God and helpful to others. In and through Jesus.

true faith struggles, as well as rests

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4

Again and again and again, we have to apply the words of scripture. Wouldn’t it be nice if we only had to do it once, and then it would be done, complete? But not so in this life, though we do want to grow so that when the same problem comes to us, or we find ourselves in the same state of mind, that somehow it is better than before. That would be good, even though at times we seem to be worse than before.

My goal in life in part is to live by faith. Living by faith does not exclude struggle, or feeling at times lost, and perhaps even undone. It does mean that in whatever we’re experiencing, or facing, we do so in faith, which means taking the words of scripture, God’s word, to heart, choosing by faith to act on them. Such times are every bit as much a part of the faith life, as the times when we’re at rest and peace. All of this a part of our lives here and now in and through Jesus.

against paralyzing fear

Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour. Resist him, standing firm in the faith, because you know that the family of believers throughout the world is undergoing the same kind of sufferings.

1 Peter 5

The most often repeated command in scripture is to not be afraid. I often carry with me nagging fears about this or that, but ordinarily relatively benign. Like the need to replace a non-functioning turn signal, or check to make sure the roof is not leaking. Even those can have a cumulative, wearing effect on us, so they do need to be addressed, even if the solution is simply to let it go as not worth the trouble. The big problem comes when fear wins over faith, when the fear we’re experiencing all but knocks out our faith.

In the passage above, a lion can gain advantage over its intended prey by paralyzing it with fear. Just a long enough hesitation can be all that the lion needs to pounce on it for the kill. Paralyzing fear is a sure sign that it’s not a legitimate fear, but one to be rejected. And that involves nothing less than spiritual warfare, even as we see from the text above (and see Ephesians 6:10-20). After working through that, we might be able to find some legitimate underlying fear, which we can take care of.

Faith in God certainly doesn’t preclude responsibility on our part. A good example of that is when the devil tempted Jesus with the words that he should simply throw himself off of the top of the temple, depending in faith on God’s promise that the angels would be there to protect the righteous when they fall. Jesus countered that text taken out of context by the devil with the scripture: “You shall not test the Lord your God” (Matthew 4). Which means expecting God to deliver what God has never promised. In faith we depend on God without reservation. While in prayer, we do what we’re supposed to do, or what might solve a problem, and settle a legitimate fear.

In all of this, no matter what we face we must have faith in God. That God will fulfill his promises, and ultimately take care of everything. And in that process, help us make decisions, and ultimately grow in wisdom and in the likeness of his Son. Individually, but also together, in and through Jesus.

The United States and us fearful Christians

Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for.

….All these people were still living by faith when they died. They did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance, admitting that they were foreigners and strangers on earth. People who say such things show that they are looking for a country of their own. If they had been thinking of the country they had left, they would have had opportunity to return. Instead, they were longing for a better country—a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for he has prepared a city for them.

….Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart.

In your struggle against sin, you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood.

Hebrews 11-12

July 4 is upon us, this being the holiday weekend preceding it. And if there’s one thing for sure, so many of us, and I’ll include myself, are hardly past the election fervor, caught up in a presidency which may turn out to be the most polarizing in US history, aside from Abraham Lincoln’s presidency during those tumultuous and horrific Civil War days. Hardly any of us like what is going on in US politics, many for similar reasons, others of us for different reasons, some of the concerns being the same across the board. It is a difficult time for a good number of reasons in a nation which is not only polarized, but threatening to be on the edge of being torn apart.

The question on this post is this: When push comes to shove, just where does our confidence lie? What do we think will win and save the day, and why? And just why are we so upset and fearful?

This is not meant to be a critique of the United States, but there’s no doubt there have been seismic changes in society, and that the liberal, progressives have been all but dismissive of the conservatives. And there’s no doubt that the conservatives themselves have written off the liberals. You have few moderates, who by many would be seen as wishy washy and weak kneed. As far as I’m concerned, while I do have opinions about US politics, and especially concerning issues of the day, none of that matters in comparison to the main point of this post. While those things have an important and provisional place, they are not at all on par with what now follows.

We as Christians, and especially the older generation of us, which includes myself, and I plead guilty, we have lost our focus and therefore are weak in our faith, and weary, in danger of losing heart. Oh yes, there will be some who will fight to the bitter end either for the Democratic Party, or for the Republican Party, or their version of what they think America needs, and won’t seem to have lost any heart at all. They have a lot of hope for good, and to avoid what isn’t good through the federal, state and local government. And again, it’s not like that has no value at all. But we in Jesus are actually called to something else, even while at the same time we pray and humbly participate according to our convictions for the good of the state.

Our goal is something better, something much more. It is to be a follower of Jesus in whatever culture we’re placed, to announce and live out the good news of the kingdom of God in Jesus, in the truth that Jesus is King with the hope that follows. We should be those who are commended for our faith in God, both confident and assured that God will fulfill his promises come what may. And that includes whatever we may face in coming days, years, or generations, should the Lord tarry.

We need to quit thinking and from that acting as if all depends on what is happening or not happening in Washington, D. C., as hard as that might seem to us, for some of us for different reasons. Our eyes need to become fixed on Jesus, period, who shows us the way as the pioneer and perfecter of faith, and of course, is the way. Faith, plain naked faith, and I mean the faith that is in the God revealed in Jesus, that is what we live for, and if need be, die for. While at the same time we faithfully pray for those in government, and hope for the best for the nation, and the world.

That is our calling. This is what we Christians in America should be known for. In and through Jesus.

See Andy Stanley’s compelling message, Fix Your Eyes, which inspired this post.