what John “the elder” and beloved apostle of our Lord might say to us now from 1 John 2:28-3:10

And now, dear children, continue in him, so that when he appears we may be confident and unashamed before him at his coming.

If you know that he is righteous, you know that everyone who does what is right has been born of him.

See what great love the Father has lavished on us, that we should be called children of God! And that is what we are! The reason the world does not know us is that it did not know him. Dear friends, now we are children of God, and what we will be has not yet been made known. But we know that when Christ appears, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is. All who have this hope in him purify themselves, just as he is pure.

Everyone who sins breaks the law; in fact, sin is lawlessness. But you know that he appeared so that he might take away our sins. And in him is no sin. No one who lives in him keeps on sinning. No one who continues to sin has either seen him or known him.

Dear children, do not let anyone lead you astray. The one who does what is right is righteous, just as he is righteous. The one who does what is sinful is of the devil, because the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the devil’s work. No one who is born of God will continue to sin, because God’s seed remains in them; they cannot go on sinning, because they have been born of God. This is how we know who the children of God are and who the children of the devil are: Anyone who does not do what is right is not God’s child, nor is anyone who does not love their brother and sister.

1 John 2:28-3:10

And now, children, stay with Christ. Live deeply in Christ. Then we’ll be ready for him when he appears, ready to receive him with open arms, with no cause for red-faced guilt or lame excuses when he arrives.

Once you’re convinced that he is right and righteous, you’ll recognize that all who practice righteousness are God’s true children.

What marvelous love the Father has extended to us! Just look at it—we’re called children of God! That’s who we really are. But that’s also why the world doesn’t recognize us or take us seriously, because it has no idea who he is or what he’s up to.

But friends, that’s exactly who we are: children of God. And that’s only the beginning. Who knows how we’ll end up! What we know is that when Christ is openly revealed, we’ll see him—and in seeing him, become like him. All of us who look forward to his Coming stay ready, with the glistening purity of Jesus’ life as a model for our own.

All who indulge in a sinful life are dangerously lawless, for sin is a major disruption of God’s order. Surely you know that Christ showed up in order to get rid of sin. There is no sin in him, and sin is not part of his program. No one who lives deeply in Christ makes a practice of sin. None of those who do practice sin have taken a good look at Christ. They’ve got him all backward.

So, my dear children, don’t let anyone divert you from the truth. It’s the person who acts right who is right, just as we see it lived out in our righteous Messiah. Those who make a practice of sin are straight from the Devil, the pioneer in the practice of sin. The Son of God entered the scene to abolish the Devil’s ways.

People conceived and brought into life by God don’t make a practice of sin. How could they? God’s seed is deep within them, making them who they are. It’s not in the nature of the God-born to practice and parade sin. Here’s how you tell the difference between God’s children and the Devil’s children: The one who won’t practice righteous ways isn’t from God, nor is the one who won’t love brother or sister. A simple test.

1 John 2:28-3:10; MSG

If the elder and beloved apostle John were here today, reading this passage, he might suggest that what is happening is nothing less than an identity crisis. And what follows from that is not good.

If we’re God’s children and followers of Christ, that will make a night and day difference. My guess is that John would talk about living deeply in Christ. How that our lives, our very thoughts and actions are to be shaped out of that. And how we can do that, indeed are called to do that no matter what we’re facing or what’s going on in the world. And how that we never have an excuse to do what Christ has commanded us not to do, flying in the face of what Christ did, how he lived.

We in Christ are God’s children, part of God’s family. Do we bear the family resemblance? Are we like our elder Brother Christ? Do we look up to him? If not, then we need to ask ourselves if indeed we are in Christ. Or are our lives more in line with the devil? Is what we’re about, and what we’re doing more in line with that? If we don’t love other brothers and sisters in Christ no matter what, that’s a sure sign we’re off track.

don’t overreact to a bad day

So we’re not giving up. How could we! Even though on the outside it often looks like things are falling apart on us, on the inside, where God is making new life, not a day goes by without his unfolding grace. These hard times are small potatoes compared to the coming good times, the lavish celebration prepared for us. There’s far more here than meets the eye. The things we see now are here today, gone tomorrow. But the things we can’t see now will last forever.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18; MSG

Paul had many many difficult days. He lived for long periods of time in difficulty, for that matter. We must remember exactly what Paul is telling us here. Day after day, God is doing his renewing work in us. And we proceed knowing that the outcome is indeed good.

It’s easy to have a good day, get up the next morning “on the wrong side of the bed” (or not want to get up at all) and just be down dingers. We can prayerfully ask ourselves how we ended the day before we went to bed which might have contributed to that. But we have to pick up and go on. Believing that God is at work. And that in the difficulty, as Paul points out again and again in the above letter, God is making himself known, yes even through our lives. In and through Jesus.

start where you’re at

“Joseph son of David…”

Matthew 1:20

2020 has been a most challenging years on so many levels. It’s hard to know where to begin, and what has happened this year has difficult as well as maybe some hopeful implications for what’s to come.

For us in Jesus, there’s always hope. Of course the hope we have is in Jesus, the Messiah of the world, our Lord and Savior, and God’s promise of a new world beginning now, to come to completion someday at his return.

There’s hope, as I just said, even in the here and now. Joseph was an obscure, humble man. He happened to be in the family line of David, but I’ll bet no one around him would have imagined that. Joseph’s story in the gospels, and particularly in this account is wonderful to consider. Mary was the mother of our Lord, but Joseph, who accepted Jesus as his son (see NIV heading) went through quite a lot himself, and I must say, admirably.

The “holy family” as they’re called in tradition: Jesus, Mary and Joseph was certainly if not quite looked down on, at least looked at with sideways glances, people wondering to each other just what was being hidden. Although it appeared obvious to anyone that there was a coverup of what was morally wrong. But Mary and Joseph pressed on. They continued on faithful, regardless.

But back to Joseph. He was certainly just one person, and seemingly of little or no consequence. But God took him where he was at, and even with what was not understood by others, and included him in a most important work by God.

God can and wants to do the same with each of us followers of Jesus. We’re “in” the greater David, Jesus. It doesn’t matter where we’re starting, or for that matter even where we end as far as appearances, or what the world may think. The important thing is faith and obedience. Learning to humbly follow and do whatever God asks of us. Yes, in difficult times, even through the darkest of times. God will be with us to not only see us through, but make us a blessing. In and through Jesus.

getting needed strength

Why would you ever complain, O Jacob,
or, whine, Israel, saying,
God has lost track of me.
He doesn’t care what happens to me”?
Don’t you know anything? Haven’t you been listening?
God doesn’t come and go. God lasts.
He’s Creator of all you can see or imagine.
He doesn’t get tired out, doesn’t pause to catch his breath.
And he knows everything, inside and out.
He energizes those who get tired,
gives fresh strength to dropouts.
For even young people tire and drop out,
young folk in their prime stumble and fall.
But those who wait upon God get fresh strength.
They spread their wings and soar like eagles,
They run and don’t get tired,
they walk and don’t lag behind.

Isaiah 40:27-31; MSG

There are times, as they say, which try men’s souls. Well, we’re living in such times now in which there are really no clear answers to the problems society faces, the divisions sharper and stronger than ever in my lifetime. And then for many of us, we have an ongoing issue with anxieties of this life, some of the concerns unavoidable, part of living in a broken world.

Isaiah’s word was to a people, God’s people, who thought that their God had forgotten them. They faced problems, just like they always had (study Israel’s history beginning with Abraham), some of it because of their own failure to trust God, because of their own sin. God’s promise of strength here comes within the context of a people whose strength was gone probably because they were gripped with fear due to their circumstances, what they were up against, real or imagined. And strength was gone.

What are God’s people to do, caught in this fix? Simple: Wait on God. That carries with it the idea of hope and trust. We believe God has forgiven us in Christ as we look to Christ for our salvation. But not only that, we look to God in and through Christ for everything else we need, including peace of heart and mind given the understandable concerns we have.

Our call here is to wait. Not something we’re necessarily good at doing in this day and age when almost anything we want or need we can have in a day, unless we’re short on resources. But for all, for everyone in Christ, all we need to do is wait, wait on God. God can give us the intestinal fortitude we need so that no matter what concerns we have, what we face, we somehow will have fresh, needed strength to carry on in whatever way is needed. We can be assured of that. Waiting in prayer, looking to God, simply waiting. In and through Jesus.

hope in the midst of despair

I remember my affliction and my wandering,
the bitterness and the gall.
I well remember them,
and my soul is downcast within me.
Yet this I call to mind
and therefore I have hope:

Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed,
for his compassions never fail.
They are new every morning;
great is your faithfulness.
I say to myself, “The Lord is my portion;
therefore I will wait for him.”

In the midst of chaos and rubble; humiliation, loss and darkness many of Israel were experiencing and had experienced- and one has to read this book to realize and more than shudder at the full impact, at what actually happened- well in the midst of all that, we have this great word of hope. Yes, actually kind of sandwiched in between despair.

We can be assured of God’s faithfulness in terms of goodness, no matter what. Even if we experience setbacks and loss and even if our sin was a factor in that, we can still have hope. Why? Because of God’s merciful love, because of God’s great faithfulness.

God wants to put us on track. But that doesn’t mean we might not have to walk through some difficult spaces. God is at work in all of that, somehow for good, if we’ll only trust him through it all.

Lamentations is indeed a book of lament. Needed lament, and we need to learn to lament. See the psalms and elsewhere, as well. Pouring out our hearts and minds to God, being silent. While also remembering God’s great faithfulness. God is for us, even when we and others have failed, and are living in the fallout of that. And God is faithful. We can be assured of that. In and through Jesus.

not losing heart

Be strong and take heart,
all you who hope in the Lord.

Psalm 31:24

It is easy in the midst of great difficulty, and when everything seems against you, to lose heart. When you see what the psalmist is up against in Psalm 31, that is a great case in point. And yet the psalm ends with the words above.

When we lose heart, we give up. We don’t do what’s needed, because we think there’s little or no hope. But that indicates that our focus is not on God and God’s promises. And sometimes we are cursing under our breath, or maybe out loud, just caving in to the pressure and all the wrong we see around us. If you read Psalm 31 (click above link), you’ll see that the psalmist was going through plenty. And that just maybe the psalmist’s thoughts in the midst of that we’re not altogether saintly.

Of course we look for relief and needed help. But key for us in Jesus is simply not to lose heart.

Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up.

Luke 18:1

It is essential for us that we don’t give up, that we don’t lose heart, whatever is facing us, and no matter what. We have to entrust ourselves and everything else into God’s hands. That doesn’t mean we don’t appeal to God in prayer. That’s central in not losing heart. Nor does it mean that we never look to others. It does mean that whatever else happens, or doesn’t happen, our hope remains fixed on God. And therefore we persevere, and don’t lose heart. It’s much easier to lose heart, but it’s also harder to live with the consequences of doing that. We have no choice really. We either keep on keeping on in faith, or we lose heart. The latter is never an option for us.

So we endeavor to walk before God honestly, grounded in reality, but trusting that God will see us through. In and through Jesus.

 

“deliver us from evil”

There is nothing good about what has happened and continues to happen in the United States to African-Americans. Where is justice? We will be judged.

Of Solomon.

Endow the king with your justice, O God,
    the royal son with your righteousness.
May he judge your people in righteousness,
    your afflicted ones with justice.

May the mountains bring prosperity to the people,
    the hills the fruit of righteousness.
May he defend the afflicted among the people
    and save the children of the needy;
    may he crush the oppressor.
May he endure as long as the sun,
    as long as the moon, through all generations.
May he be like rain falling on a mown field,
    like showers watering the earth.
In his days may the righteous flourish
    and prosperity abound till the moon is no more.

May he rule from sea to sea
    and from the River to the ends of the earth.
May the desert tribes bow before him
    and his enemies lick the dust.
May the kings of Tarshish and of distant shores
    bring tribute to him.
May the kings of Sheba and Seba
    present him gifts.
May all kings bow down to him
    and all nations serve him.

For he will deliver the needy who cry out,
    the afflicted who have no one to help.
He will take pity on the weak and the needy
    and save the needy from death.
He will rescue them from oppression and violence,
    for precious is their blood in his sight.

Long may he live!
    May gold from Sheba be given him.
May people ever pray for him
    and bless him all day long.
May grain abound throughout the land;
    on the tops of the hills may it sway.
May the crops flourish like Lebanon
    and thrive like the grass of the field.
May his name endure forever;
    may it continue as long as the sun.

Then all nations will be blessed through him,
    and they will call him blessed.

Praise be to the Lord God, the God of Israel,
    who alone does marvelous deeds.
Praise be to his glorious name forever;
    may the whole earth be filled with his glory.
Amen and Amen.

This concludes the prayers of David son of Jesse.

in the new normal

After the Lord had said these things to Job, he said to Eliphaz the Temanite, “I am angry with you and your two friends, because you have not spoken the truth about me, as my servant Job has.

Job 42:7

What happens when the heavens feel like brass, when one seems to have no peace, or it comes, but mostly is gone. Read the amazing wisdom story of Job. It’s a wisdom story, not necessarily a story about an actual event. That’s how some take it, including myself, though it really doesn’t matter. But Job found himself in the depths of complete personal loss, except that his wife who remained, counseled him to curse God and die. In this story, God is actually wagering Satan in a sense, letting Satan take his worst shot at Job without killing him to answer Satan’s accusation that Job will dismiss God since he serves God for personal gain.

Job doesn’t take this passively, the loss of his children, loss of wealth and now stricken from head to toe in misery. He questions God, and even wishes for the reversal of creation, including of course his own existence. Yet Job hangs in there. He is still talking to God, and talking around his friends who had their nicely pat theological and seemingly life-oriented answers. Recently I read these friends were like first year seminary students. Some wisdom in that thought.

Living in the new normal is not a new theme for me. I’ve lived much of my life in difficulty of one kind or another, mostly inward, though in reaction to external situations, but just a steady dull, regardless. PTSD surely is something we all experience at different levels, since we humans live in a broken world. How do we live in “the new normal”?

I think we have to do what Job did. Hang in there with God; appeal to God. Ask questions. Determine to hope in God to the end. And learn how to live as well as we can “in the new normal.” There is no sense thinking we can escape it. As in the case of Job, only God can grant that. We have to keep after it in our faith, but learn to live as well as we can. Trusting that God will see us through and give us what we need. The breakthrough and change will come. In and through Jesus.

joy, peace and overflowing hope

May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Romans 15:13

Interestingly, this more or less ends a section in which Paul is dealing with Christians weak in their faith and how Christians who are strong in theirs are to deal with that. Yes, with a word of instruction to the weak, as well. Much to be said about that within its context. But I’ll just say this about myself. I know I can feel exceedingly weak for one reason or another in my faith. Which is all the more reason to rejoice with Paul’s words of benediction or well wishing here.

Yes, God has this for all of us in Christ: the weak as well as the strong. We’re going through a decidedly difficult season now, with uncertainty ahead about the health and well being of our loved ones, of neighbors, of people in general, and with the economic fallout which is accompanying this.

But this wish is not dependent on our circumstances, but in God filling us. As we learn to trust in him more and more. In and through Jesus.

beyond what is seen now

All these people were still living by faith when they died. They did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance, admitting that they were foreigners and strangers on earth. People who say such things show that they are looking for a country of their own. If they had been thinking of the country they had left, they would have had opportunity to return. Instead, they were longing for a better country—a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for he has prepared a city for them.

Hebrews 11:13-16

I’m getting a little past the saturation point when it comes to politics and all the arguing, name calling, etc. I know politics has its place so I’ll still pay attention and pray and participate to some extent. And there are always issues that need to be addressed, something certain in this life. But I fear that we as Christians, or at least I, have largely lost the vision of the writer quoted above.

Sometimes what might be disparagingly called “Bible Christians” are criticized for being “so heavenly-minded, they’re no earthly good.” What might be missed there is all the good Christians have accomplished through the centuries for humanity. Everywhere you turn, you can trace back more than a little good to Christians. Sometimes though, it has been true that Christians seem not to care at all what happens here and now, thinking that the only thing that matters in the end is the life beyond this life. That is truly a short sighted view, and a misreading of the Bible.

Perhaps the best way to understand the above passage is not at all to project a “heaven” beyond this life when earth is gone. But the new creation in Jesus when heaven comes down to earth. Instead of a completely different existence, perhaps angelic-like in our imaginations where spirit replaces matter, the existence we live in now will be forever crowned with a fulfillment that we probably can’t imagine. Except what the Spirit gives us to experience or taste of that.

This hopefully will give us pause, even in the midst what attention and action we give to the politics of this world to remember what makes for lasting, even eternal change. As well as the one hope we can be assured will come. In and through Jesus.