someday all the brokenness gone

And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God’s dwelling place is now among the people, and he will dwell with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God. ‘He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death’ or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.”

He who was seated on the throne said, “I am making everything new!”

Revelation 21:3-5a

It is hard to imagine an existence where there isn’t at least regular great struggle. And actually to cry in this life, and mourn with others is a blessing. We are given empathy through our humanity, or by the Spirit with our humanity, so that we can enter at least sympathetically, and hopefully with empathy somehow sharing their sufferings if by nothing else more than groaning and prayers, which itself is a great gift. And as Jesus tells us in his Sermon on the Mount:

Blessed are those who mourn,
for they will be comforted.

Matthew 5:4

And in his Sermon on the Plain:

Blessed are you who weep now,
for you will laugh.

And:

Woe to you who laugh now,
for you will mourn and weep.

Luke 6:21b, 25b

So living fully in this present existence with all its pain and suffering is actually a blessing. That is where the Lord promises to be with us. Not in some safe existence free from all suffering and harm, or apart from the suffering of others.

And yet someday, blessed some Day, it will all be over. All the hurt, pain, wounds, brokenness, disappointment, sorrow, heartfelt grief, loss will be gone. “…no more death or mourning or crying or pain…” That is written to us in Revelation to be a comfort to us. We catch a glimpse of that now through the peace the Holy Spirit gives, and the help we receive in this life. But it is peace and help most often in the midst of adversity, suffering, and pain, and the inevitable trouble that accompanies this life. In the end, death.

Someday that will all be gone in and through Jesus.

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Jesus tells us not to lose hope, but pray

Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. He said: “In a certain town there was a judge who neither feared God nor cared what people thought. And there was a widow in that town who kept coming to him with the plea, ‘Grant me justice against my adversary.’

“For some time he refused. But finally he said to himself, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care what people think, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will see that she gets justice, so that she won’t eventually come and attack me!’”

And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?”

Luke 18:1-8

Jesus was more than a teacher, for sure, but he was a teacher par excellence. A good part of the gospels consist in his teaching. Of course the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7; also the Sermon on the Plain- Luke 6) might be considered the prime example of that, but then you also have his parables, such as that of “the good Samaritan,” and “the prodigal (lost) son(s).” And many others. This is one of his parables that ties faith and hope together, along with prayer.

It is easy on the surface, but it also seems hard to simply pray about things. “What must I do?” is the big question for most of us. Or just as likely, we feel like we can’t do anything at all, and so are completely at a loss since we don’t really have enough faith in God to pray.

Jesus does tie faith and hope together, just as we find elsewhere in the New Testament (1 Corinthians 13:13; 1 Thessalonians 5:8). If we have faith, then we’ll always have hope. To have faith means to pray, even to cry out to God about our trouble, or the trouble of others around us.

Jesus refers here to simple justice, which often in the world, even today (not here in the United States, though it may happen subtly) is denied to Christ-followers. We must bring our own troubles to God, rather than letting ourselves become consumed in them. And be sensitive to the problems of others. And keep doing that day after day until Jesus returns. In and through him.

completely accepting one’s place

The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places;
surely I have a delightful inheritance.

Psalm 16:6

Much of my life I aspired to something interesting ahead. But it was more or less fuzzy in my mind, and uncertain. Somehow it seemed elusive, always just beyond my grasp. One finally comes to the place where the expectation level is waning, low, or they’ve given up.

And then there were the years of disappointment, not really liking what I had to do, though grateful to God for his provision. With that can come danger when one is not simply settling into the good God has for them at the time. Not that danger isn’t always present, because it is, but we can strengthen ourselves against it by trusting in God and his word, and applying wisdom from God.

For me a recent breakthrough of sorts is to accept that what I’ve been looking for over the years simply isn’t going to be, either in some small way, or whatever. It is likely not to be. It hasn’t materialized year after year, now going into decades. Someone told me a few years back that I am exactly at the place God wants me. I couldn’t understand that at the time; it seemed disappointing at best.

Settle down, and settle in, the Lord could be saying. And recognize the good God has and is giving you, both in terms of blessing received and being a blessing to others. Do good where you’re at, and praise the Lord.

Something I believe God has impressed on me just recently.

our hope in the salvation and new creation to come

Years back I read a book (or parts of it) which suggested that we never arrive to complete satisfaction or fulfillment in this life, even while we do have experiences of such (like just a calm day in the wonder of creation somewhere), because God has something better to come. Not that this life isn’t good, and doesn’t have good, even much good. But there are problems galore. The curse due to sin is certainly on us. It is a fallen, broken existence here, everywhere you look. And yet glorious as well, since God is the creator. And humans are created in God’s image with both a great capacity for good, and due to being sinners and even under the influence of moral, spiritual darkness, for evil.

This doesn’t mean we fold our tents and sit around waiting for the Lord’s return, not at all. We are busy and seeking to live in faith, believing that this world matters in God’s eyes, and should matter to us. It is God’s creation which God redeemed and reconciled to himself in Christ, and will someday make completely new after the final judgment and salvation to come at Christ’s return.

We want to do the best we can now, but with the realization that a curse lies on everything. This makes it harder now, but it also helps us relax and just keep on keeping on while this and that goes wrong, or is not what we would like it to be. Also with the realization that we sadly don’t even have a glimpse of some of what we might and maybe should understand, in this life, that we are limited indeed.

We are thankful to God for answered prayer and all the good in this life. But we know God has something better for us and for the world in the new creation to come when God makes all things new in Jesus. It will still be breathtaking and glorious and wonderful, and much more so, because the curse will be gone. In and through Jesus.

the foundation of the reality in which we live

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead…

1 Peter 1

I recently wrote about how faith is not psychological, but embedded in reality, and how this is a breakthrough for me. I was certainly referring to reality, but in terms of spiritual, and actually, the result of what happened materially, as well as spiritually: Jesus’s resurrection from the dead.

The main point of this post is that Jesus actually rose from the dead into a new state of spiritual, material embodiment. Our faith is grounded in Christ’s resurrection, after he had died for our sins. Paul said that if the resurrection of Jesus is untrue, than our faith is worthless (1 Corinthians 15). For skeptics who want proof, the four gospel accounts weighed together: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, have pushed many a doubter or skeptic into acceptance of the possibility, and probability. And into belief of the same, which can lead to a living faith.

Our faith in Jesus is based on what happened in history with many eyewitnesses who saw him, and knew that while he still shared in their humanity, there was something markedly different. They knew he had died, and was buried, and lo and behold, that he was now alive, breaking bread with them, eating fish, but also disappearing before their very eyes. Not a ghost, since he indeed had flesh and bone. But somehow not a mortal any longer, either.

Christ’s resurrection is the beginning of God’s new creation into which all who have faith in Christ, all who are in Christ partake. To be fully experienced of course, at the resurrection when all things are made new. But begun now even in this life, even during the days of our humiliation as mortals here on earth. By faith we hope in the sense of anticipation in God’s promise of the new world to come, the Spirit within us being the guarantee, and assurance of what’s to come for us as God’s children, as well as for all creation. In and through Jesus.

not having easy ready answers

But in your hearts revere Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect, keeping a clear conscience…

1 Peter 3:15-16a

The older I get, the more I question even my own questions or answers, for that matter. My typical response to things is “I don’t know,” or “It’s complicated.” That’s not to say that I don’t have some opinions on a whole range of issues. And even convictions. Although given the nature of things, much of it can be on matters that are rather open ended. The answer may be good insofar as it goes, but it’s open to refinement, and even some correction.

But when it comes to life itself, and what’s at the heart of it, I wouldn’t hesitate to think, and hopefully say, It is God in Jesus, and the good news in him in his incarnation and life, death and resurrection, ascension and the outpouring of the Spirit, with the promise of his return. That is something I believe without so much as a thought that it might need some correction here or there. Of course only God fully understands even the most simple gospel truth, such as John 3:16. We understand by faith as much as God helps us to, of these simple, yet profound truths, which are brought home to our hearts and minds by the Spirit of God.

And we’re to tell them to others. Not having all the answers, or being a know-it-all. But simply being able to point to the one who is the way, the truth, and the life. In whom we have put our faith and hope, our all. And through whom we know God’s love, which we share with all others. Jesus.

making sense of nonsense

As humans, we are rational beings. We want to understand as much as we can, and try to make some sense of things. Necessarily, we factor in reason, as well as our experience, and at best, together. And if we’re wise, we surely will consider how generations past have grappled with life: their thoughts and practices, in a word, their tradition.

In some sense this is a never ending process, open to refinement, or just to the application necessary to the times in which we live. In another sense, for people of faith, there are certain matters that are fixed. The basis for that is both scripture and tradition. The church of the Great Tradition: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and the like, will put both on an equal par, actually on the basis of scripture. Other churches such as those within Protestantism, will see scripture as the authority, but if they’re wise, I think, will understand that scripture does give some serious weight to tradition, particularly how the church has interpreted the point of scripture, the gospel, over the centuries. So that even within differences of understanding that, essentially the heart of the gospel is the same, found in Jesus, and in his death and resurrection, and all that’s related to that.

What can become a crisis of faith is experience along with thoughts which seem to give the lie to God. And specifically the great, good God of the Bible. But if we read all of the Bible, we’ll find that it mirrors life: the good, the bad, the beautiful, and the ugly. We are often left with no answer to our question, “Why?” both in terms of life, and sometimes within the pages of scripture itself. Although there are explanations, some of them tied to the idea that the secret things belong to God, left to God’s understanding, while the things revealed belong to God’s people, to hold on to for life, what is called truth (Deuteronomy). So that in the end we have to trust God.

The answer for us in the here and now is simply to learn to live in the never ending tension of life, both what makes sense, and what from our perspective is sheer nonsense, and maybe the case from God’s perspective, as well. Though God is at work to bring good out of it all, even what forever will be evil.

In the main point of scripture, the gospel, God used the greatest evil to bring about the greatest good at the cross, in the death of Christ. We hold on to that, both in terms of understanding God and life. There is something which ultimately will override all the nonsense of this world. And sense will take care of it all in the end in God’s good judgment and justice to come, and the salvation which follows.

In the meantime, I continue to hold to this, the idea that what makes sense will prevail, only through faith. Certainly the resurrection of Jesus as given to us in the gospel accounts, being a major factor for acceptance of the faith. But also a faith which amounts to a trust in God, even when it seems that the bottom has fallen out in our experience, or maybe even thought, so that there’s nothing left to stand on.

God is underneath, and around all of that. And the truth of the gospel, the good news in Jesus is the hope and even assurance we have that all will be well in the end.