a key part of enduring: accept

Yesterday’s post was about enduring when our faith is tested. A key and important aspect of such endurance, it seems to me, faith being a given, is simply to learn to accept whatever place one finds themselves in, including the trial itself.

One of the most difficult aspects of trials is often our resistance to them. We want to escape anyway possible, to be rid of it, and we often imagine the worst. Instead of committing ourselves to God’s care and working, and willingly walking through it.

This doesn’t mean that we are happy about the trial itself. Our happiness in the midst of it is solely in the realization that God is at work both to bless us, and make us a blessing to others. Oftentimes God’s work of character development in us toward the image of Christ, along with his work for the good of others is occurring. What is important for us is to hold on in faith. And a part of that, of our trust in God, is to simply accept the experience, with all its hard knocks and difficulties. And both the external, as well as internal facets of it.

I have often found that it’s not long before a sense of resolution either in movement, or even finality sets in. Usually my own experience in this is that my reaction is worse than the problem itself, often one of anxiety and fear. Or just feeling numb from it all.

So we’re called not only to wait in persevering in endurance in the trial. But to accept everything, believing that God is at work in it in ourselves, and in the situation, for our good and the good of others. In and through Jesus.

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the beginning of finding the end

Hear my cry, O God;
    listen to my prayer.

Psalm 61

The beginning to finding the point of anything, probably not so much in terms of meaning, as in something of resolution, is to pray. The line above is the beginning of a great psalm, so formative for us in certain ways. It’s not long. Read it for yourself (the above link).

We must turn to God in prayer, and keep that posture of heart, mind, and life. We are usually struggling over something. That in itself is a help for us to turn with all our need to God.

We tend in our brokenness to want to solve life ourselves, or take in the latest popular advice. Instead, we need to turn to God, to the gospel. The Spirit speaks to the church.

We need to call out, and listen. And trust and obey. In and through Jesus.

life is fleeting

Now listen, you who say, “Today or tomorrow we will go to this or that city, spend a year there, carry on business and make money.” Why, you do not even know what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes. Instead, you ought to say, “If it is the Lord’s will, we will live and do this or that.” As it is, you boast in your arrogant schemes. All such boasting is evil. If anyone, then, knows the good they ought to do and doesn’t do it, it is sin for them.

James 4:13-17

Often life doesn’t seem fleeting. Especially when we’re young. We’re waiting for this or that, or planning ahead, whatever it might be. But that’s only an illusion. Life is fleeting; it is passing, soon to be gone forever.

Tragically for some it can go in a moment of time. Really for any of us. Recently for a young woman, not long married, with a four year old daughter in a car accident. None of us know what a day may bring forth. Not just a trite saying, but truth.

There are those who just say party up, knowing that it will all end soon:

“Let us eat and drink,
    for tomorrow we die.”

1 Corinthians 15:32; Isaiah 22:13

The point for us all is both that we should take note just how quickly all of this may and ultimately will be gone, and live in the light of that. Both. It is easy either to live as if only this moment or time matters, or to simply carelessly, either not taking the brevity of life into account, or else live as if it won’t end. It is amazing how we can so easily live in denial of this, or just throw in the towel, and think that nothing matters.

Ecclesiastes likens life to a breath. How it goes about as fast as it comes. With the conclusion that we’re to fear God and keep his commandments, knowing that every act of ours will be brought into judgment.

Today will end soon. It’s more important that we live it well, in God’s will in Jesus, then that it goes like we would like it to go. How can we live in a way that’s pleasing to God and helpful to ourselves and others? That’s the question we must ask. As we prayerfully seek to live according to God’s good will in his grace to us in and through Jesus.

making sense of nonsense

As humans, we are rational beings. We want to understand as much as we can, and try to make some sense of things. Necessarily, we factor in reason, as well as our experience, and at best, together. And if we’re wise, we surely will consider how generations past have grappled with life: their thoughts and practices, in a word, their tradition.

In some sense this is a never ending process, open to refinement, or just to the application necessary to the times in which we live. In another sense, for people of faith, there are certain matters that are fixed. The basis for that is both scripture and tradition. The church of the Great Tradition: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and the like, will put both on an equal par, actually on the basis of scripture. Other churches such as those within Protestantism, will see scripture as the authority, but if they’re wise, I think, will understand that scripture does give some serious weight to tradition, particularly how the church has interpreted the point of scripture, the gospel, over the centuries. So that even within differences of understanding that, essentially the heart of the gospel is the same, found in Jesus, and in his death and resurrection, and all that’s related to that.

What can become a crisis of faith is experience along with thoughts which seem to give the lie to God. And specifically the great, good God of the Bible. But if we read all of the Bible, we’ll find that it mirrors life: the good, the bad, the beautiful, and the ugly. We are often left with no answer to our question, “Why?” both in terms of life, and sometimes within the pages of scripture itself. Although there are explanations, some of them tied to the idea that the secret things belong to God, left to God’s understanding, while the things revealed belong to God’s people, to hold on to for life, what is called truth (Deuteronomy). So that in the end we have to trust God.

The answer for us in the here and now is simply to learn to live in the never ending tension of life, both what makes sense, and what from our perspective is sheer nonsense, and maybe the case from God’s perspective, as well. Though God is at work to bring good out of it all, even what forever will be evil.

In the main point of scripture, the gospel, God used the greatest evil to bring about the greatest good at the cross, in the death of Christ. We hold on to that, both in terms of understanding God and life. There is something which ultimately will override all the nonsense of this world. And sense will take care of it all in the end in God’s good judgment and justice to come, and the salvation which follows.

In the meantime, I continue to hold to this, the idea that what makes sense will prevail, only through faith. Certainly the resurrection of Jesus as given to us in the gospel accounts, being a major factor for acceptance of the faith. But also a faith which amounts to a trust in God, even when it seems that the bottom has fallen out in our experience, or maybe even thought, so that there’s nothing left to stand on.

God is underneath, and around all of that. And the truth of the gospel, the good news in Jesus is the hope and even assurance we have that all will be well in the end.

our Father will take care of it

Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?

Matthew 6

Anyone who knows me well knows I can be prone to worry. Although I’ve come a long way in overcoming it, mostly by dealing with it much better. But also by being in the word, in scripture, which helps prevent its onset since our minds are occupied elsewhere. And where they’re occupied when we’re in scripture is in terms of God’s will, which is actually good, and in terms of the real world in which we live, which is wonderful, yet also fraught with danger and death, not to mention degradation.

Jesus’s words in the Sermon on the Mount can help us with the realization that our lives are in the Father’s hands (link above). God will let nothing pass through other than that which he allows. And there honestly is mystery in that. Why are some beset with problems, and at times, even disasters, while others seem to live long, relatively trouble free lives? We don’t know, but we have to trust that God will work good out of what always will be evil. And that God redeems, and can indeed rescue. We pray, and ask God for his help for ourselves and others. And above all, we seek to entrust ourselves, our lives, our all, and especially our loved ones into the tender hands of the Father’s care. In and through Jesus.

saying all you would like to say

I know that wisdom makes us keep our mouths shut, and not say much of what we might think at the time. Proverbs, and perhaps the most proverb like book of the New Testament, James, makes that clear.

There is much one would like to say though, which might be good, even indeed wisdom gathered over a lifetime, including from one’s failures, falls, and about the grace God extended. Of course our lives are never done until our last breath. As long as we have sound mind, and up to the point we have, we should be learning right up to the very end. And we want to pass on what might be good, and what indeed is good from God on to others, especially to our loved ones, our immediate family.

One thing for sure: All I would like to say becomes more refined and limited over time. On many issues over which I might have some strong opinions, I won’t necessarily say much, because I don’t want any of that to mute what I consider to be of “first importance.” And actually that thought can help refine my own thinking on secondary matters. The gospel is first and foremost, and while centered in Jesus, in his death on the cross, and his resurrection, its outcome and concern from that is as big as all life. So that, while we need to tread softly and wisely, we do need to speak gently and humbly concerning important issues like abortion, racism, the environment, and with ever a ready ear to listen well.

The big thing for me though is to help others with what gift I have in trying to communicate what I’ve learned over a lifetime. Even as I seek to continue to learn well from and in and through Jesus.

blessed routine

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.

Ecclesiastes 5:18-20

There is something it seems like our society wants to get away from, to escape as much as possible, which I actually should be appreciated, if it was recognized for the blessing it is. That is, routine. I’m thinking in terms of regular responsibility, which actually is a privilege to be involved in, and carry on. Instead nowadays, it seems like people want as much freedom and free time as possible. I’m not at all suggesting that there might be better ways to do work, or that we always have to do things the same way. Or that we should work long hours and long weeks, with little time off. No. And there may be new approaches to work that are different and fresh, indeed, helpful.

Usually trouble follows us wherever we go, not just because we’re creating it ourselves hopefully, though that reality exists from which we can learn, even if just from being finite beings. But simply because we live in a broken, fallen world. It seems like if something can “so south,” it will, being hard to keep everything pointed to “the true north” (these sayings from the compass). Due to imperfections everywhere, from nearly every direction, there will be trouble. And that simply becomes a part of the normal routine we have to work on, and live with.

We’re to find satisfaction in all of that, no less, and even, no more. Ecclesiastes suggests that if wealth is added to that, then that’s all well and good, people occupied with gladness of heart, I suppose being able to do this and that, to enjoy life. Whereas those financially strapped, or living in relative poverty may be limited, yet hopefully blessed with a job to make ends meet. Though sadly here in the United States, a living wage is not guaranteed for any forty hour job. One should be able to live in humble quarters, and provide well enough for themselves with a full time job. Life isn’t easy, although some pieces are dropping in to many places, for example in Africa, to help societies and families have work, and provide for their own. The free enterprise system and capitalism are regularly beaten up by many progressives, but in my opinion, are not evil in and of themselves. Any system can become wrong, or more accurately have many wrongs because of the people who are in charge and in place in them.

Continuing on in the blessed routine, in whatever God gives us, should be something we learn to appreciate. For some of us, retirement age is approaching. If God gives us health, that can be a step into another blessed routine, of day in and day out, doing much the same things, hopefully to our own enjoyment, and even delight, and for the blessing of others. As we continue on as witnesses in all of this, to the truth and power of the good news of God in Jesus.