making the best of a bad situation

Sometimes in life, whether or not it’s the case, we may believe we’re on a sinking Titanic. Things are not falling out in a way we would have imagined, and not in a way we would consider good. That may be when the Lord is getting us ready for something new either in the midst of the mess, or for something entirely different. And it likely will involve making the best of a bad situation.

Oftentimes in my life if something disappointing happens, especially in part at least, thanks to me, then I endeavor to not only correct it, but see something come out of it which makes it better than what it was before.

It is key to pray and pray and pray some more, then keep on praying. Of course that helps change us, but it can also change others, and perhaps even circumstances. God can move mountains in response to faith and prayer, as Jesus said. At the same time, we might as well face it: Life is hard. God is good. And God’s goodness in the midst of life’s badness, or difficulty, is precisely what we need. And we really need this in community, together with others in Jesus, the church. We are to face the hardships of life together; we’re in this together. It’s never the case of “I made it, and someone else didn’t.” If one suffers, all suffer with them; if one rejoices, all rejoice together, in Christ’s body, the church. And so we need to level with God and with each other, the latter in the right context with some wisdom and discretion.

And in the midst of the bad, we have to look for the good. From God, in and through Jesus.

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looking toward the end

Sometimes there seems to be no answers, or the prospects don’t look good. Maybe it’s telltale signs, or even possible indications that our time may be drawing near. It is amazing how resilient we humans can be, but we’re also so fragile in this life.

We will naturally do what we can to prolong our lives and make them better, but we can’t escape reality, as the years go by, and seem to hasten on. We likely will take a good look at our lives with some, and even maybe much lament, but also with understanding, and even thanksgiving to God for God’s goodness in his grace and mercy in the midst of it.

It is important that we think in terms of how we end well, or live life now, whatever age we are, because our mortal existence is uncertain and death is certain, unless of course the Lord returns prior to that. I think most importantly we should want to make first priority, love within our family. Where relationships may have been hurt, we need to seek healing. And we simply need to be present with others. Not on our computers or phones, but really present with them. And above all, we need to pray.

Of course we also need to be committed to a church, part of a fellowship or communion of believers in Christ. Meeting regularly for teaching and worship, and participating with each other in small groups, or however our church practices that, sometimes in the meetings themselves. And we need to be drawing near to God ourselves, daily, and all throughout the day.

All of this we want to do in prayer, and with God’s help. In the love of God, loving others. In the word, and in prayer. Trying to leave a blessing behind for those who follow us, a spiritual blessing, though where we can be a help materially can be good as well. All of this as always, in and through Jesus.

wisdom has its reward, but lacking wisdom has its consequences

32 “Now then, my children, listen to me;
    blessed are those who keep my ways.
33 Listen to my instruction and be wise;
    do not disregard it.
34 Blessed are those who listen to me,
    watching daily at my doors,
    waiting at my doorway.
35 For those who find me find life
    and receive favor from the LORD.
36 But those who fail to find me harm themselves;
    all who hate me love death.”

Proverbs 8

In Proverbs 8, wisdom is personified as a woman who has been called Lady Wisdom. Proverbs is perhaps the book for application of wisdom to life. In fact wisdom in part, from that book, means or involves skillful living.

But to ignore wisdom is to be foolish, to descend into foolishness. There seems to be both a special wisdom which comes with the fear of God (reverence and awe) at its beginning, as well as a general wisdom given to all humankind. Both as gifts from God. And both can be spurned. Sin can move people in that direction, but there’s also a common grace which can help humans, who are made in God’s image live more by wisdom.

Wisdom calls out to us our entire lives, helping us avoid our own foolish propensities, which we think will save us, but actually are quite destructive. And again Proverbs is the book to go to, to read (or listen to), and it’s good to read it slowly, and all the way through. And not only read it, but be committed to live by the wisdom God gives us, in and through Jesus.

 

the our Father/Lord’s prayer in thinking about the gospel and life today

“This, then, is how you should pray:

“‘Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
    on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
    as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,[a]
    but deliver us from the evil one.[b]

Matthew 6:9-13

How do we look at what the good news (which is what gospel means) in Christ, and all of life? Oftentimes we evangelicals are criticized for being navel gazers so to speak, the idea of it being all about my salvation and walk with God and management of life. And when it comes to the world at large, we are also criticized for not seeing community as more important than the individual, without bypassing any individual. I think much of the criticism is probably justified to some extent. Not that other groups don’t have their blinders on. And not that the evangelicals don’t have some strengths, because I believe we do.

But regardless of what Christian tradition we’re a part of, the Our Father/Lord’s prayer can help us get a view in keeping with the Biblical view of God’s will for us and for the world. And what is to be basic for us. It is a prayer worth repeating every Sunday as a church (the evangelical mega church where we’ve been taking our grandchildren, and probably will join does not), and every day of our lives, or at least regularly. Of course it has to be read in light of all the rest of scripture. But it is basic and formative in helping us understand what our view of the impact of the gospel and the world should be. All of this in and through Jesus.

accepting one’s lot

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.

Ecclesiastes 5:18-20

It probably has taken me quite a while, but I think I’ve finally come around to begin to completely accept my lot in life with all the challenges and disappointments that come along my way. Life is like that; it is not some kind of dream vacation. Rather it is the hum-drum of challenge, effort, setback, failure at times, more effort, repentance all along the way, and remaining at it day after day.

And then there’s all the good that comes, if we could just see it. Wrapped up in the gifts God gives us, like the good wife I have, the grandchildren, the good I see in our daughter, the provisions God gives us to live and enjoy life.

Yes, in my case I would have liked to have been a pastor or teacher, but it didn’t pan out for this reason or that. I still maybe have some faint glimmers of dreaming about what I would like to see in whatever more days God allots to me. But above all, I want to more and more not only accept, but embrace whatever God gives me, and whatever place I find myself in. Knowing that God is good and that he will provide and help us as we seek to help others and be a blessing. In and through Jesus.

back to the Bible

I have a call for both progressive and conservative Christians, and really for everyone regardless of what stripe or tradition in Christianity we might be. We all need to get back to the Bible.

I know no one reads the Bible without interpreting it, just like any other book. And theology informs that reading of scripture, just as scripture ought to inform one’s theology, shorthand here for one’s understanding of the faith and the gospel. But the Bible by itself will impact you if it really is God’s breathed out, written word. In your heart, mind and practice.

Back to the Bible is one of my favorite Christian organizations, probably second to Our Daily Bread Ministries where I work. I love what they try to do, and look like they’re still doing in a helpful new way. I remember the days of Theodore Epp, who used to be, and in a sense still is one of my favorite Bible teachers.

I would like not only to see any theological system challenged probably mostly in refining, but perhaps with some bigger changes through the reading and study of scripture. But just as importantly, each one of us. We need to go back to scripture again and again, pore over it, ask the hard questions, and keep reading and praying. We won’t be disappointed if we continue to do that. And like Charles Spurgeon noted, there’s never an end to the depths we find in scripture as well as the life in and through Jesus.

a marathon

So since we stand surrounded by all those who have gone before, an enormous cloud of witnesses, let us drop every extra weight, every sin that clings to us and slackens our pace, and let us run with endurance the long race set before us.

Now stay focused on Jesus, who designed and perfected our faith. He endured the cross and ignored the shame of that death because He focused on the joy that was set before Him; and now He is seated beside God on the throne, a place of honor.

Hebrews 12:1-2; VOICE

In the United States, we love the sprinters, “the world’s fastest humans,” and we pay little attention to marathons, though perhaps that has been changing in recent times. Part of that might be our penchant for instant entertainment and results. We probably are not all that good at processing things, therefore we prefer a song (which might be good) of three to five minutes duration over a symphony any day. Anything that takes time and involves process is not what we’re all about, or programmed for.

But all of that said, the Christian faith and life is all about process and longevity. It is not about some great flash into arrival and unending success. If we don’t believe that, maybe we would do well to read the passage linked above which includes all of Hebrews 11. But much of our Christianity seems to be different. It is about greatness now in the sense of doing great things, and in some sense having arrived. But I don’t see scripture, and life that way at all.

We never know what a day may bring, but we have to be in it, committed for the long haul. We have to have a marathon runner’s mentality, not the sprinter’s. Many things will happen along the way. Seeming failure, setbacks, mistakes, challenges, unforeseen problems, whatever it might be. But we go on, maybe get up and go on, but definitely go on. We’re in it for the long haul. Looking to, indeed fixing our eyes on Jesus. What we’re called to. In and through Jesus.